Brown Rat

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Brown Rat

 

(Rattus norvegiens), a mammal of the order Rodentia.

References in periodicals archive ?
Also, Huff (2002) reported that the positive RI findings for toluene were "less than overwhelming," the negative NTP findings for vinylidene chloride "less than adequate because the use of a maximum tolerated dose [MTD] had not been clearly demonstrated," and the positive RI findings for vinylidene chloride were for "increases in leukemias and total malignant tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats whose exposure began in utero.
At 8 weeks of age female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ovariectomy.
Therefore the Sprague-Dawley rat liver microsomes may be useful for assessing herb-drug interaction in the hepatic first-pass metabolism responsible for CYP1A2 at the early drug-discovery stage because of similar typical substrates and metabolism activities as humans.
This diet was fed to Sprague-Dawley rats obtained from the animal care facility at Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH.
The current top candidates to replace the F344/N rat are the Wistar Han and Sprague-Dawley rats, both outbred strains.
Six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (180-200 g) were purchased from the National Laboratory Animal Center, Mahidol University, Thailand and transferred to the Northeast Laboratory Animal Center, Khon Kaen University, Thailand.
Repeated ANOVA test shows that administration of darapladib exhibits an unsignificant role to decrease the thickness of PVAT in Sprague-Dawley rats with hypercholesterol diet.
So, a simple and cost-effective method was developed to induce solid mammary gland tumour in female Sprague-Dawley rats using LA7 cells (18,19).
Total of 25 female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 200-250 g, supplied by Chenur Supplier Sdn.
In their study, Posnack and colleagues exposed whole hearts, taken from adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, to various concentrations of BPA (0.
In experiments with Sprague-Dawley rats, renal effects are more intense than in the liver, including inflammation, necrosis and apoptosis (RYLEY et al.