spreading coefficient

spreading coefficient

[′spred·iŋ ‚kō·i‚fish·ənt]
(thermodynamics)
The work done in spreading one liquid over a unit area of another, equal to the surface tension of the stationary liquid, minus the surface tension of the spreading liquid, minus the interfacial tension between the liquids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The spreading coefficient was calculated from Harking equation [34], using Eq.
Further, we propose a new parameter called spreading coefficient by intimacy among nodes, which counts the number of joined nodes accurately.
In order to solve the abovementioned problems, this paper first establishes a mechanical model of a deviscous sliding wall based on classical mechanics and functional relationships and establishes the connection between the spreading coefficient, wall impact, and drop shape.
Topical preparations like cream, ointment have many limitations like less spreading coefficient, less penetration through stratum corneum, less patient compliance due to stickiness or need to apply with rubbing etc.
In Table 1 the surface tension and spreading coefficient values calculated for the different systems.
It is generally desirable to have the surface tension of the ink less than that of the surface energy of the substrate, to provide a positive spreading coefficient and lead to good printability.
A related parameter is the spreading coefficient, S, of a liquid 2 (an adhesive, for example) on a solid 1.
Model: The Spreading Coefficient. Hobbs and co-workers [30] used the Harkins spreading coefficient concept for ternary blends to predict the tendency of polymer A to encapsulate dispersed domains of a second polymer C in a matrix of the third polymer B.
Both the spreading coefficient and minimal free energy surface models have been used extensively to predict the morphology of ternary and quaternary blends (23-37).
(32) used the concept of spreading coefficient to predict the morphology of ternary blends.
(12) explained the morphological observation for ternary polymer blends on the basis of spreading coefficient by modifying the Harkin's equation, in which two dissimilar phases are dispersed in the third phase (matrix).
The positive spreading coefficient of the systems with high enough [W.sub.a] (NA and SP) further ensures considerable adsorption onto the nanofillers, and hence, these systems exhibit much enhanced properties by virtue of intercalation rendered possible through an optimum balance of W& spreading coefficient, and the entropy factor.