Spriggans


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Spriggans

grotesque fairies; “dourest and most ugly set of sprights.” [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 380–381]
References in periodicals archive ?
(Sea 33) Since "[t]he life force is ever moving, altering its appearance" (Sea 70)--and since it animates all levels of creation--the Celtic belief structure recognizes a bewildering variety of forms of existence: "sprites and boggarts, will-o'-the-wisps and pixies, spriggans and flibbergibbets" (Land 79), pookas, kobolds, hobgoblins, finfolk, old gods such as the Man in the Moon, the Forest Lord, or Yarthkins, monster creatures such as kelpies (Land 171-172, 414-415), knuckers, Pictish beasts, draugrs, and hogboons.
Once again, Tully hit the road, and came to settle in Childwall, where he had discovered a thriving colony of gnomes, brownies, spriggans, trolls, hobgoblins, pixies, elves and bogeys.
The underworld of the fairies, which invisibly but persistently penetrates the human world (there are sneering and chattering Thrumpins on the backs of businessmen, Spriggans and Kelpies carousing in bars) is a desolate place of despair, superficially glamourous but damaged and rotten within.