Spur


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Related to Spur: Heel spur, Bone spur

spur

1. a pointed device or sharp spiked wheel fixed to the heel of a rider's boot to enable him to urge his horse on
2. a sharp horny projection from the leg just above the claws in male birds, such as the domestic cock
3. a pointed process in any of various animals; calcar
4. a tubular extension at the base of the corolla in flowers such as larkspur
5. a short or stunted branch of a tree
6. a ridge projecting laterally from a mountain or mountain range
7. another name for groyne
8. a railway branch line or siding
9. a short side road leading off a main road
10. a sharp cutting instrument attached to the leg of a gamecock
11. win one's spurs History to earn knighthood

Spur

A decorative appendage on the corners of the base of a round column resting on a square or polygonal plinth, in the form of a grotesque, a tongue, or leafwork.

Spur

 

(1) In birds, a horny spine situated on a protuberance of the bones of the posterior or anterior legs. The spur serves as a defensive or offensive weapon. In Phasianidae the spur is located on the dorsal side of the metatarsal bone; it occurs most often in males. The tooth-billed pigeon, the spurred lapwing, and jacanas have a single spur, whereas screamers have two spurs on the bend of the wings. Spur-winged geese have sharp spurs on the metatarsal bones and on the wing folds.

(2) In cloacal mammals, spurs are found on the hind limbs, near the tarsus. They are well developed in males; females have only a rudiment of a spur. Inside the spur there is a duct of a poisonous gland, which is weakly expressed in females. The sharp back claws on the inside digits of the hind legs of the clawed frog are also referred to as spurs.


Spur

 

a small, curved piece of metal that has a spike or a small wheel and that is secured to a horseman’s shoe at the heel. Spurs are used to control the horse. Spurs were first used by the Celts, with the earliest archaeological finds dating from the fifth century B.C. Spurs were mentioned by Greek authors as early as the fourth century B.C. Although such gear was not worn in the ancient East, medieval Eastern peoples did use in its place a point on the rear of the stirrup.

Spurs were first worn in what is now the USSR in the first and second centuries A.D., among tribes of the Lipitsa and Przeworsk cultures, in what is now the Western Ukraine. Spurs came to be widely used in ancient Rus’. In the Middle Ages, spurs were an attribute of knighthood. The present-day spur is a small, curved implement with a small wheel, or rowel, attached to the fork at the end of the spur’s neck. 129–1407–1]

spur

[spər]
(botany)
A hollow process at the base of a petal or sepal.
A short fruit-bearing tree branch.
A short projecting root.
(geology)
A ridge or rise projecting from a larger elevational feature.
(hydrology)
ram
(mathematics)
(physics)
A cluster of ionized molecules near the path of an energetic charged particle, consisting of the molecule ionized directly by the charged particle, and secondary ionizations produced by electrons released in the primary ionization; it usually forms a side track from the path of the particle.
(zoology)
A stiff, sharp outgrowth, as on the legs of certain birds and insects.

spere, speer, spier, spur

In medieval English residences and derivatives, a fixed screen projecting from the side of a great hall, near a door, to mitigate drafts and to screen the door’s entrance.

spur

spur, 1
1. An appendage to a supporting structure, as a shore, prop, or buttress; a decorative appendage of the base of a round column resting on a square or polygonal plinth, set at the corners, and taking the form of a grotesque, a tongue, or leafwork. Also called a griffe.
2. A spere.

SPUR

An early system on the IBM 650.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959)].
References in classic literature ?
For, the moment the spur touched him, his left hind leg had reached forward in a kick that struck the stirrup a smart blow.
Half a dozen times spurs and quirt bit into him, and then Daylight settled down to enjoy the mad magnificent gallop.
Daylight grunted, driving in spurs and quirt again and again.
Hanson grinned, for he recalled the pounding heels that he had seen driving sharp spurs into the flanks of Baynes' mount; but he said nothing of what he had seen.
With his shaggy head thrown back like birds when they drink, pressing his spurs mercilessly into the sides of his good horse, Bedouin, and sitting as though falling backwards in the saddle, he galloped to the other flank of the squadron and shouted in a hoarse voice to the men to look to their pistols.
Their sabers catching in the bridles and their spurs jingling, the hussars hastily dismounted, not knowing what they were to do.
Meantime, however, I admired Mary Ann's pretty doll, and all its possessions; and then told Master Tom he was a capital rider, but I hoped he would not use his whip and spurs so much when he rode a real pony.
He heard footsteps approaching, and drove his spurs so fiercely into the roan as to force a surprised groan from the animal as it leaped forward.
The young man threw his spurs into the horse, crouched very low, and swerved in his flight in order to distract the other's aim.
For these feats of horsemanship two things are necessary: a most severe bit, like the Mameluke, the power of which, though seldom used, the horse knows full well; and large blunt spurs, that can be applied either as a mere touch, or as an instrument of extreme pain.
The man nodded, and the girl drove the spurs in sharply and quickly, calling upon the horse for its utmost, but watched her own horse forge slowly ahead of her.
Chris threw himself forward against her neck to keep her from falling backward, and at the same time touched her with the spurs to compel her to drop her fore feet to the ground in order to obey the go-ahead impulse of the spurs.