Squanto


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Squanto
Tisquantum
Birthday
BirthplacePatuxet territory, Wampanoag Confederacy (now Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts, U.S.)
Died
NationalityPatuxet tribe
Known for Helping the pilgrims during their first visit to North America

Squanto

or

Tisquantum,

d. 1622, Native American of the Patuxet (or Pawtuxet) band, part of the WampanoagWampanoag
, confederation of Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). In the early 17th cent.
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 confederation. He is sometimes thought to be the Native American taken to England from the Maine coast by George Weymouth (1605) and returned by John Smith in 1615, but it is certain that he was kidnapped by Capt. Thomas Hunt in 1615, lived in England, and returned (1619) to North America with Capt. Thomas Dermer. In 1621 he acted as interpreter in concluding a treaty between the Pilgrim settlers and MassasoitMassasoit
, c.1580–1661, chief of the Wampanoag. His name was Ousamequin (spelled in various ways); Massasoit is a title of leadership. One of the most powerful native rulers of New England, he went to Plymouth in 1621 and signed a treaty with the Pilgrims, which he
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, who had made Squanto a captive. Squanto became friendly with the Plymouth colonists, aiding them particularly in their planting and fishing. He later treacherously sought, and failed, to turn the Pilgrims against Massasoit. While acting as guide and interpreter on William Bradford's expedition around Cape Cod, he fell ill and died.
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Squanto

(?1580–1622) Pawtuxet interpreter; born on Cape Cod. He is thought to have been the same as the Indian named Tisquantum who was first captured along the Maine coast and taken to England; he evidently lived there until 1614, when Captain John Smith took him back to Cape Cod. In 1615, Squanto was captured by another English sea captain and sold into slavery in Spain; he escaped and made his way to England. After a brief visit to Newfoundland, he was taken by another English sea captain to serve as a guide along the New England coast but Squanto escaped and made his way to his Pawtuxet homeland; finding his people wiped out by smallpox, he went to live with the neighboring Wampanoags. In 1621 he was introduced to the Pilgrims at Plymouth; he served as their interpreter in their treaty with Massasoit, showed them how to plant corn, where to fish, and generally helped them survive in an unknown environment. He died from a fever while guiding Governor Bradford's expedition around Cape Cod.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her characters' lives and motivations--from You Choose and Rick to their guardian Mina; from Le-a and Squanto to the twin boys Jerusalem and Daniel--aren't fully realized, but what is explored paints a vivid picture.
The pilgrim hats and feather headbands don't quite fit and Gooney's version of Squanto's dance is a little like a tango (which she is sure he learned while in England).
Massasoit, his brilliant ambassador Squanto, and their excellencies the
Let's just say quoting "shall not be infringed" probably won't get you very far despite the Commonwealth's Fire-arms Record Bureau form sporting the Massachusetts Coat of Arms "adopted by the revolutionary provincial congress of Massachusetts in 1775," per Flags of the World, replete with a bow and arrow-armed Squanto, an arm holding a sword, and the motto "Ense petit placidam sub liberrate quietem" ("By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty").
The colonists of Plymouth Bay and Massasoit--"sachem," or leader, of the Wampanoag--were able to make an alliance despite differences and the plotting of their interpreter and intermediary, Tisquantum (also known as "Squanto").
Squanto could not have betrayed his original tribe even if he had wanted to; they were already extinct when he finally got back from England.
Or we may still see Squanto as a stereotypical red-faced Indian, rather than the dignified and brave presence of Tisquantum, native of Patuxet who belonged to the Wampanoag federation of tribes, a former slave who learned English and whose role was integral to the very survival of the Pilgrims.
Since then, it has inducted 38 honorary members into the Hall of Fame, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Eli Whitney, Squanto, Arthur Capper, George Washington Carver and Robert J.
Tisquantum (Squanto), Manida, Dehamda, Skettwarroes, and Assacumet were
He soon returned with another Indian named Squanto who spoke better English than Samoset.
The name Squanto has entered American history and folklore as the one of the last of the Patuxets who assisted the Pilgrims in 1620.