Squatina


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Squatina

 

(monkfish, or angel sharks), the only genus of the family Squatinidae. Monkfish resemble rays in that they have extremely flattened bodies; large, broad pectoral fins; and eyes on the upper part of the head. This resemblance may be explained by the fishes’ similar ways of life. The gill slits, as in all sharks, are on the sides of the body, in front of the pectoral fins. There are 11 species, distributed in moderately warm and subtropical waters of all oceans. Monkfish are not encountered in the tropics. They live on the sea bottom, often in shallows, and sometimes burrow into the sand. The largest species is Squatina squatina, which is up to 2.4 m long and weighs up to 72 kg. Other species are considerably smaller (0.6-1.5 m.). Monkfish feed on small benthic fishes, sea urchins, mollusks, and crabs. They are viviparous and bear ten to 25 young. The commercial value of monkfish is minor.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dos nuevas especies del genero Squatina (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae) del Golfo de Mexico.
Genus Nearshore Oceanic Squatina X Heterodontus X Nebrius X * Palaeorhincodon O Carcharias X Isurus X * Carcharocles O Scyliorhinus X X Mustelus X Hemipristis X Galeocerdo X X * Physogaleus O * Abdounia O Negaprion X
These two species and the rhinobatid Aptychotrema vincentiana and the squatinid Squatina australis, which are also caught as bycatch by commercial fisheries, collectively contributed as much as 17% to the total biomass of the 172 species of fish caught during extensive trawling along the lower west coast of Australia (Hyndes et al., 1999).
Among the primary species in observed landings were the scalloped hammerhead, Sphyrna lewini (15.2%, n = 148), Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica (11.6%, n = 113), blue shark, Prionace glauca (11.4%, n = 111), Pacific sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon longurio (11.3%, n = 110), and pygmy devil ray, Mobula munkiana (8.6%, n = 84).
The top-ranked elasmobranch by weight (finfish group) was the Atlantic angel shark, Squatina dumeril, ranked 6th, followed by the roughtail stingray, Dasyatis centroura, ranked 13th.
The addition of these species (green jack, Caranx caballus; pile surfperch, Damalichthys vacca; middling thread herring, Opisthonema medirastre; white surfperch, Phanerodon furcatus; Pacific sierra, Scomberomorus sierra; scalloped hammerhead, Sphyrna lewini; angel shark, Squatina californiaca; leopard shark, Triakis semifasciata) brings the total up to 86 species, even closer to the predicted number of 89 species.
Additionally, in the same year, a third double-rig fleet started to operate in Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul states (Southern Brazil), focusing mostly on the coastal Argentine stiletto shrimp Artemesia longinaris (Bate) and Argentine red shrimp Pleoticus muelleri (Bate), flatfishes (Paralichthys patagonicus Jordan) and angel sharks (Squatina spp.) (Haimovici, 1998).
freminvillei, Diplobatis pictus, Narcine brasiliensis, Rhinobatos percellens, Rhinoptera bonosus, Rhizoprionodon porosus, Rhizoprionodon spp, Squatina dumeril, Urobatis jamaicensis.
paucus Longfin mako Lamna nasus Porbeagle Odontaspididae Carcharius taurus Sand tiger Orectolobiformes Ginglymostomatidae Ginglymostoma cirratum Nurse Hexanchiformes Hexanchidae Hexanchus vitulus Bigeye sixgill Heptranchias perlo Sevengill Squaliformes Squalidae Squalus acanthias Spiny dogfish Squatiniformes Squatinidae Squatina dumeril Atlantic angel Heterodontiformes Heterodontidae Heterodontus francisci Horn shark Order Family and species Code (n) Carcharhiniformes Carcharhinidae Carcharhinus acronotus Cacr003(3) C.
Squalus blainvillei Hexanchiformes Chalmydoselachus anguineus Heptranchias perlo * Hexanchus griseus Pristiformes Pristis pristis Squatiniformes * Squatina squatina Torpediniformes ?