Sruti


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sruti

 

(also shruti), in the classical music of India, the smallest interval between two sounds. It is also a principle of scale gradation into 22 unequal degrees.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In Upadesasahasri I.xviii.3, Samkara stated that scripture (sruti) teaches with the zeal of a devoted mother.
Two short play reading (sruti natak) dramas were enacted a€" one by the Chakrabarty family (Susanta, Dipanwita and Gandharbi) on the third generation NRBsa€™ perception of Tagore and another a€" Jibon Brittanto, dwelling on the a€?chronicle of lifea€™.
jaurn asa karaurn tadapi na badal, muehi badhem nahim kachu manusal kaula kama basa krpina bimiirha, ati daridra ajasl ati hurha sada rogabasa samtata krodhi, bisnu bimukha sruti samta birodhl tanuposaka nimdaka agha khani, jivata sava soma caudaha prani (RCM, 6.31.1-2) If I were to do such (i.e., kill you), it would never meet with praise; killing a corpse is not a feat at all.
As regards dharmasastra's contribution to broader discussions of legal authority, it partly affirms what we expect from legal rules: the authority of sruti and smrti is asserted to be peremptory and not in need of rational defense--it is amimamsya 'not to be questioned'.
Whatever the reason, unlike later authors Apararka explicitly justifies the reconciliation of the following generally accepted exegetical principles: A) sruti texts override smrti texts, and B) more specific rules override more general ones.
"Un des traits assez deconcertants de son oeuvre," Suzanne Siauve wrote about Madhva alias Anandatirtha, "est le fait qu'il cite un nombre considerable de Sruti inconnues qui, a de rares exceptions pres, ne sont utilisees par aucun auteur anterieur ni posterieur a lui, pas meme a l'interieur de son ecole" (La doctrine de Madhva [Paris 1968], 24).
But Mimamsa and Advaita can also be differentiated by recensional differences, for example, their respective closer connections to the Madhyandina and Kanva recensions of the Brhadaranyaka Upanimd; even hermeneutics are differentiated, the Mimamsakas opting for the principle of context (prakarna) and Vedantins for "a maximum of matching quotations associatively accumulated from as many different sruti [revelatory] and smrti [traditional] text-places as possible" (p.
Three sources or "roots" (mula) are most commonly mentioned in the standard Sanskrit texts on religious law: 1) sruti, or the Vedas, i.e., unassailable revelation, 2) smrti, the recorded "memory" of great sages, and 3) acara, the standards or "customary laws" of communities.
While he also suggests that the knowledge of enlightened sudras could somehow have arisen from hearing the puranas and itihasas, this is certainly an inadequate basis for claiming that Sankara believed there to be a valid, established discipline of knowledge based on smrti, as opposed to sruti, texts; for he repeatedly insists that it is only from comprehending the meaning of the mahavakyas of the Upanisads that one achieves self-knowledge.