St. Bartholomew's Day

St. Bartholomew's Day

August 24
St. Bartholomew is the patron saint of beekeepers and honey-makers, and for this reason it was traditional in England for the honey crop to be gathered on August 24. Since the main ingredient in mead—an ancient alcoholic drink that is still made in some parts of England today—is honey, the Blessing of the Mead is also observed on St. Bartholomew's Day.
In ancient Rome, mead was offered to the gods of love and fertility. Although few people today still believe that drinking mead will help a marriage produce children, the drink is still believed to have curative powers.
In St. Mount's Bay, Cornwall, a special ceremony is held by the Almoner of the Worshipful Company of Mead Makers. It begins with a church service, and then the participants move to the Mead Hall, where the Almoner, who is also the vicar of the parish, blesses the mead that has been fermenting for two years and pours it into a special cup. The mead can then be moved to a storage vat. In the past, mead was traditionally drunk from a bowl, known as a mazer, made from birds-eye maple with a silver rim.
See also Bartholomew Fair; Schäferlauf; Stourbridge Fair
CONTACTS:
Visit Britain
551 Fifth Ave., Ste. 701
New York, NY 10176
800-462-2748 or 212-850-0330; fax: 212-986-1188
www.visitbritain.com/us
SOURCES:
AmerBkDays-2000, p. 606
YrbookEngFest-1954, p. 113
YrFest-1972, p. 61
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even more present than the collective perception of Catherine as a domineering matriarch and monarch was the most notorious event that occurred on her watch: the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre in August of 1572.
Effects felt in England from the major events of the 1570s, especially the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, are approached with careful attention to detail regarding the complicated events themselves, but also with close consideration of the people involved, their motivations and brutal machinations.
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But the nuptials only leads to the infamous St. Bartholomew's Day massacre as Catholics attack Huguenots, leading to the death of thirty thousand people.
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However, her strategies for creating harmony have been obscured by the violent controversy she aroused for her presumed role in the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre of 1572.
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* Catherine De Medici, Queen Regent of France, implicated in the death of four of the Scottish delegates for the return of Mary, Queen of Scots, and the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre.
Historians also have knowledge of the strong hostilities against Catherine de' Medici and her Italian advisors that formed in Protestant and Malcontent circles after the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre.
Despite many powerful enemies and numerous attempts to unseat him, Ramus more or less held this position from 1551 until his murder in the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of 1572.