St. Crispin's Day

St. Crispin's Day

October 25
According to legend, Crispin and his brother Crispinian traveled from Rome to the French town of Soissons, where they preached and earned a living as shoemakers, offering shoes to the poor at a very low price and using leather provided by angels. The people of Soissons built a church in their honor in the sixth century, and since that time they have been known as the patron saints of shoemakers and other workers in leather. People who wore shoes that were too tight were said to be "in St. Crispin's prison."
This is also the day on which the French and English armies fought the battle of Agincourt in the middle period of the Hundred Years War (1415). The association between the feast day and the battle is so strong that writers sometimes use "St. Crispin's Day" as an expression meaning "a time of battle" or "a time to fight." This day is also called the Feast of Crispian, St. Crispian's Day, Crispin's Day, Crispin Crispian, and the Day of Crispin Crispianus .
SOURCES:
BkDays-1864, vol. II, p. 492
BkHolWrld-1986, Oct 25
DaysCustFaith-1957, p. 267
DictDays-1988, p. 101
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 261
FestSaintDays-1915, p. 188
FolkWrldHol-1999, p. 600
OxYear-1999, p. 427
(c)
References in periodicals archive ?
more unto the breach" exhortation surrounded by the outdoor audience, transforming members into the "band of brothers" the king will laud a few scenes later in his St. Crispin's Day speech.
In addition to the bloody battles, the film echoes with "big'' speeches, every one of them a variation on the "St. Crispin's Day'' pre-battle exhortation by the young king in Shakespeare's "Henry V.''
But even more important, Henry resounds, pity all absent Englishmen, now asleep in their beds across the Channel, who--because they did not fight this St. Crispin's Day battle--must forever hold their manhoods cheap.
On the eve of battle, young King Henry rouses his troops (and the movie audience) with the now-famous St. Crispin's Day speech, not asking them to fight for a cause or country, but for the honor and glory of standing shoulder to shoulder with other heroes, for the privilege of being admitted to that small "band of brothers" whose ties are forged in combat.
Halfway toward becoming Richard III without the hump, a propagandist who has abandoned his Rastafarian roots (seen in flashback footage of Lester's Henry) in favor of an almost fearful zealotry as he delivers the St. Crispin's Day speech astride his tank.
The interesting point about that play is that Shakespeare ignores the unique force of English longbowmen which historians acknowledge won the battle at Agincourt, implying instead that the battle on St. Crispin's Day was won by a British spirit that was essentially democratic in a nation where "honour's thought reigns solely in the breast of every man".