St. Laurent, Louis Stephen

St. Laurent, Louis Stephen

(săN lôräN`), 1882–1973, Canadian political leader. A well-known lawyer, he entered (1941) political life as minister of justice and attorney general in the Mackenzie KingKing, William Lyon Mackenzie,
1874–1950, Canadian political leader, b. Kitchener, Ont.; grandson of William Lyon Mackenzie. An expert on labor questions, he served in Wilfrid Laurier's Liberal administration as deputy minister of labor (1900–1908) and minister of
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 government; he was later minister of external affairs (1946–48). He was elected to the House of Commons in 1942 and succeeded King as Liberal partyLiberal party,
Canadian political party. Prior to confederation in 1867, reform parties advocating greater local participation in provincial governments, free trade, and increased separation of church and state existed in Canada West, Canada East, and the Maritime Provinces.
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 leader, taking office (Nov., 1948) as prime minister after King's retirement. His party failed to obtain a majority in 1957, and John G. DiefenbakerDiefenbaker, John George
, 1895–1979, Canadian political leader. Elected to Parliament (1940), he succeeded George Drew as leader of the Progressive Conservative party (1956), and (1957) succeeded Liberal Louis St.
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, a Conservative, succeeded him as prime minister. On his retirement in 1958 Lester B. PearsonPearson, Lester Bowles,
1897–1972, Canadian diplomat and political leader, b. Ontario prov. He served in the Canadian army in World War I. Pearson taught history at the Univ. of Toronto from 1924 to 1928 and then joined the Canadian diplomatic service.
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 became Liberal party leader.

Bibliography

See biography by D. C. Thomson (1968).

St. Laurent, Louis Stephen

 

Born Feb. 1, 1882, in Compton, Quebec Province; died July 25, 1973, in Quebec City. Canadian state figure.

St. Laurent served as minister of justice from 1941 to 1946 and in 1948 and and as minister of external affairs from 1946 to 1948. Between August 1948 and January 1958, he was the leader of the Liberal Party. From November 1948 to June 1957, he was prime minister. He was responsible for Canadian intervention in Korea (1950–53) and for increasing Canada’s military, economic, and political dependence on the USA, expressed in the agreements of 1953 and 1955. While he was prime minister, Newfoundland was incorporated into Canada (1949). St. Laurent retired from political life in 1958.

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