St. Quentin Canal

St. Quentin Canal

 

a canal in northern France. The St. Quentin Canal connects the Oise River near Chauny, via the city of St. Quentin, with the Schelde River at Cambrai. It was constructed over the period 1738–1810 and later modernized. It is 92 km long and has several locks. Approximately 1 million tons of freight, notably coal, metals, and building materials, pass through the canal every year. The St. Quentin Canal serves France’s Northern Industrial Region and Paris.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Pauline Haycock, 77, Jim's niece, who has been researching his story, decided to visit the St. Quentin Canal and retrace her uncle's movements in the area.
On this occasion his citation read that: "On the 28th September, 1918, near the St. Quentin Canal, near Bellenglise, he dressed and carried many wounded men under heavy artillery fire.
After a break at Vadencourt they went back into the attack on 29th September capturing a portion of the St. Quentin Canal and the Hindenburg Line north of St.