stabilizer

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stabilizer:

see airplaneairplane,
 aeroplane,
or aircraft,
heavier-than-air vehicle, mechanically driven and fitted with fixed wings that support it in flight through the dynamic action of the air.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stabilizer

 

an aerodynamic surface providing stability for an aircraft in flight. The stabilizer of an airplane is the fixed or movable leading section of the horizontal empennage. A stationary stabilizer provides stability and has an elevator attached by a hinge to its trailing edge. A movable, controlled stabilizer, which sometimes lacks an elevator, provides both stability and control. Such stabilizers are usually mounted on supersonic airplanes when elevators are not sufficiently effective at high altitudes. The stabilizers of rockets are placed in the tail section and displace the center of pressure of the aerodynamic forces acting on the rocket in atmospheric flight toward the rear of the rocket.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stabilizer

[′stā·bə‚līz·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
Any airfoil or any combination of airfoils considered as a single unit, the primary function of which is to give stability to an aircraft or missile.
(chemical engineering)
The fractionation column in a petroleum refinery used to stabilize (remove fractions from) hydrocarbon mixtures.
(engineering)
A hardened, splined bushing, sometimes freely rotating, slightly larger than the outer diameter of a core barrel and mounted directly above the core barrel back head. Also known as ferrule; fluted coupling.
A tool located near the bit in the drilling assembly to modify the deviation angle in a well by controlling the location of the contact point between the hole and the drill collars.
(materials)
Any powdered or liquid additive used as an agent in soil stabilization.
Any substance that tends to maintain the physical and chemical properties of a material.
(mathematics)
The stabilizer of a point x in a Riemann surface X, relative to a group G of conformal mappings of X onto itself, is the subgroup Gx of G consisting of elements g such that g (x) = x. Also known as stability subgroup.
(naval architecture)
Any of the submerged fins used on ships to prevent rolling.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stabilizer

A substance used to increase the stability of a solution or suspension, usually by preventing precipitation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stabilizer

stabilizer
The fixed horizontal tail surface that has elevators and a rudder hinged to its trailing edge.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

stabilizer

, stabiliser
1. any device for stabilizing an aircraft
2. a substance added to something to maintain it in a stable or unchanging state, such as an additive to food to preserve its texture during distribution and storage
3. Nautical
a. a system of one or more pairs of fins projecting from the hull of a ship and controllable to counteract roll
4. either of a pair of brackets supporting a small wheel that can be fitted to the back wheel of a bicycle to help an inexperienced cyclist to maintain balance
5. an electronic device for producing a direct current supply of constant voltage
6. Economics a measure, such as progressive taxation, interest-rate control, or unemployment benefit, used to restrict swings in prices, employment, production, etc., in a free economy
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The servo stabilizers the company provides have a low running cost along with an innovative design that saves energy.
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The rising demand for non-degradable, durable, and high-performance products in automotive, packaging, and furniture & construction industries has fueled the growth of HALS in the global UV stabilizers market.
For optimal accuracy, you want a long stabilizer with a lot of mass at its end.
Reporting a market share of 55%, Asia-Pacific is the worldwide largest sales market for stabilizers, followed by Western Europe.
Thermolite 831 and 813 octyltins are major stabilizers for use in food-grade bottle and sheet applications.
PVC breaks down over time and the decomposition is accelerated by increased temperature or humidity, even with stabilizers. The chalking on the surface of the cable jacket contains high levels of LEAD.
Cost Effectiveness: Gum Technology stabilizers are extremely cost efficient.
For this column, the Bowhunter editorial staff has surveyed bow accessories makers (as well as Alpine Archery, a bow company with a specific line of stabilizers) and obtained a number of hunting stabilizers for field-testing.
The intent of this paper was to evaluate several organophosphonate-based bleach stabilizers as a metals management strategy for minimizing peroxide decomposition and maximizing peroxide brightening reactions during [P.sub.HT] bleaching of kraft pulps.
This article examines five alloying elements as possible pearlite stabilizers to promote improved properties in gray cast iron production.