Stable Fly


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Related to Stable Fly: horse fly, horn fly, Stomoxys calcitrans
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stable Fly

 

(Stomoxys calcitrans), a fly of the family Muscidae, order Diptera. Widely distributed, it is found in abundance in direct proximity to domestic animals, both in stables and in pasture. It develops in manure, especially horse manure. Several generations are produced during the course of the summer.

Massive infestations of stable flies cause the cows’ milk yield and the milk fat content to decrease. Stable flies transmit organisms that cause many infections, including anthrax, tularemia, and cattle anaplasmosis. Stable-fly larvae are destroyed by treating their place of reproduction with water emulsions of trichlormetaphosphate, trolene, methylnitro-phosphate, and other substances. Adult insects are controlled by spraying the premises with aerosols containing chlorophosphate and other insecticides; poisoned bait and flypaper are also used.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the research provided data on stable fly distribution and seasonality, which could make it easier to manage this pest at zoos by predicting the best times to set out traps.
The three larval stages are similar in appearance to stable fly larvae.
The sequence obtained from a stable fly (Stomoxys spp.) collected in the dairy cattle barn was identical to that for B.
"The accumulation of wasted hay, manure, and urine at these feeding sites creates an ideal habitat in the pasture for stable fly larval development," Taylor says.
We have identified the larval gut of the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, as an environmental reservoir for E.
The stable fly can make cattle miserable, and producers have had only limited success in using traditional insecticides against the pest.
Once considered mainly a feedlot pest, the stable fly has extended its reign of terror to the open pasture and rangeland, areas where cattle once grazed virtually unharried by the bloodsucking insect.
Of particular interest were those capable of persisting in cow manure long enough to kill house and stable fly larvae over an entire season.
He conducted control studies on the stable fly and horn fly at the newly opened Kerrville facility.