Stadtholder


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Related to Stadtholder: Political absolutism, Hanoverian Dynasty
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stadtholder

 

(also stadhouder), the viceroy in the Netherlands of Burgundian and later of Hapsburg sovereigns during the 15th and 16th centuries. After the 16th-century bourgeois revolution in the Netherlands, the stadtholder was the chief executive power in the United Provinces of the Netherlands until the end of the 18th century.


Stadtholder

 

in a number of European countries, an official who exercised state authority over a certain territory. Stadtholders existed in the Netherlands during the rule of the Burgundian and Hapsburg dynasties, in the crown lands of the Austrian Empire, and in Austria-Hungary until 1918. In the German Empire from 1871 to 1918, the term stadtholder was applied to the governor of Alsace-Lorraine. The office of Reichsstatthalter existed in fascist Germany from 1933 to 1945.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Originally the residence of Count John Maurice of Nassau, the Mauritshuis is now a privatized museum which features the collection of paintings of William V, Prince of Orange, the last Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic.
After James II fell to the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the Dutch stadtholder William III, the Prince of Orange, acceded to the English throne, where he forged a coalition with Hapsburg Austria and various German Protestant states to engulf the French in a series of religious wars.
In sections on topography and representation, power and identity, and rite and memory, they consider such topics as urban space beyond the walls: siting Islamic funerary complexes in Konya; the funerary complex of Sultan Qalawun (1284-85): between text and architecture; the Capilla Real in C rdoba: transcultural exchange in medieval Iberia; the stadtholder's two bodies and the visibility of power: the tomb of William of Orange in the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft; and a widespread taste for the macabre, apotropaic, or political marks: urbanism, landscapes, and funerary architecture in the Indian sultanates.
(57) In fact, Verhoeff's request to build a Dutch fort angered Raja Bongsu so much that the latter penned a letter of complaint to Verhoeff's political superiors in Europe--the stadtholder and the States-General--insisting that this was a violation of the terms spelled out in his Malay copy of the September 1606 treaty signed with Matelieff.
The chronicles about the Dutch rule in the northeast region also record dinners and even sumptuous feasts, some given by Conde Mauricio de Nassau (Maurice of Orange, also known as Maurice of Nassau, stadtholder of all the provinces of the Dutch Republic) himself, to important men of the region, of course to soften in them the hate towards the so-called Nordic invasion which, incidentally, has left in the northeast region language a Dutch dish name: brote (page 38).
In the United Provinces, Stadtholder Prince William (I) of Orange (1533-84) may have been on the verge of being invested with ducal power in Holland and Zeeland at the time of his murder in 1584, but throughout the subsequent existence of the Dutch Republic his descendants were never offered a similar title by the wary Dutch.
The original remedy for England's innumerable pains was the Revolution of 1688, which placed the Dutch Stadtholder William of Orange on the English throne, as the fundamentals of Whig freedom and justice and prosperity supplanted the tyranny of insufferable popish militancy that was the last gasp of medieval divine royalty:
With the defeat and execution of Charles I, and the death of the royal stadtholder William II, the English republic sent Strickland back with Oliver St John in 1651 to pursue full union.
I was curiously aware of crowding ghosts--memories of the freebooters who had claimed this broad new territory for their crowded Netherlands, its proudly Protestant Stadtholder, and their Dutch East India employers.
Even though conclusive evidence is lacking, Jeroenszoon appears not to have won his case (which dragged on for several years), partially because Sonoy enjoyed the protection of stadtholder William of Orange (1533-84), the Dutch political supremo of the day.