Staging Theory

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Staging Theory

 

a linguistic hypothesis that presupposes a definite sequence of shifts in linguistic types. The theory arose under the influence of evolutionist ideas, and variants were developed by W. von Humboldt, A. Schleicher, A. Trombetti, N. Ia. Marr, and 1.1. Meshchaninov. In Soviet linguistics, proponents of the staging theory studied the laws governing the development of thought in their search for the factor inducing change from one linguistic stage to the next. The inadequacy of staging systems resulted from the limited linguistic base drawn upon and from the insufficiently developed methodology of historical and typological research. These deficiencies caused the errors in both the formal-structural and content-oriented approaches to the staging theory.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the summer of 1961, Joan had checked out 25 books, nearly all about missing persons and murders.<br />A new theory emerged: She had staged her murder and disappeared.<br />Though many accepted the staging theory, her husband and a number of her friends did not.