Stalingrad


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Stalingrad:

see VolgogradVolgograd
, formerly Stalingrad,
city (1989 pop. 999,000), capital of Volgograd region, SE European Russia, a port on the Volga River and the eastern terminus of the Volga-Don Canal. As a transshipment point, the port handles oil, coal, ore, lumber, and fish.
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, Russia.
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Stalingrad

unsuccessful German assault on Stalingrad, Russia (1942–1943). [Ger. Hist.: EB, IX: 517]
See: Battle

Stalingrad

German army succumbs to massive Soviet pincer movement (1942-1943). [Ger. Hist.: Fuller, III, 531–538]
See: Defeat
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main festivities are under way in Volgograd (former Stalingrad), where the Soviet troops encircled and routed, in the wake
Russia is proud of the defenders of Stalingrad," Putin told veterans in the city.
It is regarded as a turning point in the war, with many of the victors of Stalingrad then turning the tables and pushing deep into Nazi-dominated Europe, eventually defeating the Nazis and taking Berlin in 1945.
It is apparent from the wealth of material presented that during the battle for Stalingrad the Red Army engaged in an urban war of attrition that neutralized superior German operational effectiveness.
The German offensive to capture Stalingrad commenced rapidly at first in the late summer of 1942, supported by Luftwaffe aerial bombing that turned much of the city into mere piles of rubble.
Jones presents Stalingrad: How the Red Army Survived the German Onslaught, a compelling military history and analysis that lives up to its title.
The group flirts with overt political imagery in their album art--not to mention song titles like "Stalingrad" and "High Revoltage"--yet seeks to personalize issues rather than preach about them.
The second lecture will be given by Anthony Beevor, author of 'Stalingrad', who will talk about his latest book 'The Mystery of Olga Chekhova'.
The defining foreign policy issue, the Iraq war, is treated in a chapter with the title 'The Second Battle of Stalingrad'.
From the brutality of the Japanese occupation of Singapore to the street battles of Stalingrad, from the bombed out Villages of France, Italy, and Germany to the comparative quiet of the American home front.
The roots and antecedents of the behaviour of the Red Army can be found in Beevor's previous best-seller, Stalingrad. Indeed it was while writing the history of Stalingrad that the author stumbled across the theme of his new book.
Our `journey' started in Verdun, which has a similar significance for the French as Stalingrad has for Russians--evoking memories of two world wars.