Stalingrad


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Stalingrad:

see VolgogradVolgograd
, formerly Stalingrad,
city (1989 pop. 999,000), capital of Volgograd region, SE European Russia, a port on the Volga River and the eastern terminus of the Volga-Don Canal. As a transshipment point, the port handles oil, coal, ore, lumber, and fish.
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, Russia.

Stalingrad

unsuccessful German assault on Stalingrad, Russia (1942–1943). [Ger. Hist.: EB, IX: 517]
See: Battle

Stalingrad

German army succumbs to massive Soviet pincer movement (1942-1943). [Ger. Hist.: Fuller, III, 531–538]
See: Defeat
References in periodicals archive ?
It is dedicated to those who lost their lives in The Battle of Stalingrad, which lasted 200 days and left 1.
Around 200 veterans of the Battle of Stalingrad - most in their 90s - took part in a poignant parade from the central Square of the Fallen Fighters, marching behind a WWII Red Army T34 tank.
Trawling through the endnotes and noting the research that has gone into this and the previous volume, it is increasingly apparent that it is unlikely in the short-medium term that this work or its predecessor will be challenged as operational histories of the fighting for Stalingrad, and it is in this regard that this work will stand the test of time and represent a significant contribution to the literature.
The mythological fascination with the battle of Stalingrad has triggered a rich canvas of responses that is by no means limited to the cultures and individuals involved in the actual event.
The FAuhrer was "determined to capture Stalingrad at all costs," The Times reports quoted Agent Knopf, as reporting.
Having initially examined both German and Soviet plans for the summer campaign and the preliminaries to operations on the Stalingrad axis such as the Khar'kov battle of May 1942, the subsequent chapters look initially at operations on the principal axes toward Stalingrad.
Vladislav Tushev, a Red Army man fighting at the Ukrainian front who corresponded with his mother in Stalingrad, described in a letter of March 1944 what receiving a letter from her meant to him and how his front unit celebrated the delivery of mail:
The Germans did not learn from their victory at the triangle, and the Russians began recognizing weakness and produced a large armored force, capable of holding at Stalingrad and winning at Kursk.
The Eastern Front Day By Day, 1941-45" is a photographic chronology that includes key battles on land, at sea, and in the air, including the great encirclement engagements of 1941 at Minsk, Smolensk, Kieve, Leningrad, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Operation Bagration.
But as the air grows colder and the situation in faraway Stalingrad heads south, Friedrich wonders if he should have listened to his father.