Stambul


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Stambul:

see İstanbulİstanbul
, city (1990 pop. 6,748,435) and metropolitan muncipality, capital of İstanbul prov., NW Turkey, on both sides of the Bosporus at its entrance into the Sea of Marmara. Since 2004 the metropolitan municipality and province have been coterminous.
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, Turkey.
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Stambul

, Stamboul
the old part of Istanbul, Turkey, south of the Golden Horn: the site of ancient Byzantium; sometimes used as a name for the whole city
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Popular entertainment venues, such as circus and komedi stambul tents and moving picture exhibition spaces, counted among the few sites that continued to attract and accommodate thousands of people of mixed ethnicities and social classes in close quarters on a daily basis.
Most movie-goers in the Indies would have already gained familiarity with many or all of these classics, stories and plays through their previous adaptation for the komedi stambul stage.
Pierre Stambul, 2007, "Anti-Semitism, Anti-Zionism and "Anti-Israel ismno.
Malay opera had evolved from two hybrid forms of theatre originating in the Malay peninsula, forms that by the 1910s were used interchangeably: bangsawan and komedie Stambul. Bangsawan had originated in the Straits Settlements in the late nineteenth century.
Tio and Miss Riboet claimed to have modernised Stambul. They, however, were not the only ones to make such claims.
Ketoprak is a genre of costume drama accompanied by gamelan music, ultimately derived from nineteenth-century hybrid theatres including the Parsi theatre and komedi stambul. Originally patronized and performed by members of the noble elite, by the 1930s ketoprak was mostly in the hands of the wong cilik or 'little people.' Courtly drama set in Java's legendary past remained the genre's staple, however.
For example, Kunst, who had worked closely with the Indonesian nobility to gather much of his data on Javanese music, disapproved of popular performing arts such as stambul and bangsawan theatre and the associated syncretic Indonesian kroncong music, which were being disseminated by radio, cinema and phonograph recordings in Indonesia and Malaysia from the 1920s.
One was the king of Rum (also called Raja Stambul), the second was the king of China, and the third was the king of Minangkabau.(39) As Islam spread into the west coast of Sumatra, the name of Raja Rum came to be more well-known among the Toba-Batak through influence from Barus.