Stand Age

Stand Age

 

one of the basic valuational criteria which characterize a stand. Stands are divided into classes according to their age. For coniferous and hardleaved deciduous stands grown from seeds, 20-year age classes have been determined; for undergrowth and softleaved deciduous stands grown from seeds, ten-year age classes; and for species of brushwood, five-year age classes. A stand in which the ages of the trees vary within the limits of a single class is considered to be of the same age, whereas if the ages fall within several classes, the stand is considered to be of different ages. The ages of trees are determined by the number of annual layers (rings), as seen on the stumps of sample trees which have been cut down or on a cylinder of wood which is removed from the trunk of a growing tree by a special borer. Another method of determining the age of trees is by external criteria, such as the color of the needles, the form of the crown, and the color and structure of the bark.

References in periodicals archive ?
2006) reported that microhabitat and stand age of sand have effects on soil seed viability and seedling development.
Two different stand age groups were formed (5 to 7 years and 8 to 12 years), each with approximately the same number of sample plots, based on statistical tests that showed differences in key attributes, including density, diameter, and volume.
Enright NJ and Goldblum D (1998) Demography of a nonsprouting and resprouting Hakea species (Proteaceae) in fire-prone Eucalyptus woodlands of south-eastern Australia in relation to stand age, drought and disease.
26] focused on the ant population ratio in natural forests and oil palm plantations, but she had not yet discussed how changes in ant communities in line with the development of peat land with different palm stand age.
The trajectory of a let-grow forest -- one that is not harvested but left to grow -- is based on the observed rate of live tree carbon by stand age.
Douglas-fir forests in the Oregon and Washington Cascades: Relation of the herpetofauna to stand age and moisture.
The working hypotheses of the present research were that root and leaf adaptation strategies differ between tree species and stand age affects tree structure, and leaf and root morphology.
Normal yield tables provide estimates of expected yields tabulated by stand age and site index for ideal, fully stocked or normal forest stands.