standard broadcasting

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standard broadcasting

[′stan·dərd ′brȯd‚kast·iŋ]
(communications)
Radio broadcasting using amplitude modulation in the band of frequencies from 535 to 1605 kilohertz; carrier frequencies are placed 10 kilohertz apart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using standard radio equipment, they were able to defeat the encryption on the keyless entry system of a (https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-key-fob-cloning-security-update-ota-software/) Model S and clone the key fob of the sedan within a matter of seconds.
The move will see a fleet of Mahindra e-Verito sedans joining Meru's fleet in Hyderabad, and will ply at the same tariff as standard radio taxi sedans as prescribed by the Telangana Government.
It does not cost much to buy a hand-crank emergency radio that can access shortwave as well as standard radio channels.
The one researchers hear is broadcasting a standard radio signal, charging its batteries with sunlight.
Developers can choose from a standard radio implementation across a range of process nodes from multiple foundries.
Almost sub-consciously I must have quickly detected the hallmarks of the standard radio obituary: sombre, respectful tone, chronological narrative, tributes etc.
A standard radio platform has also been identified and the acquisition process is well underway.
Zigbee is based on IEEE 802.15.4 which is a general-purpose, low-power wireless radio standard that allows different protocols to be built on top of the standard radio. Zigbee set out to support low power sensor networks capable of covering a large area.
The standard radio remote control and upgraded electrical system will also further enhance operator safety and control.
"The police are working to confirm this belief, and forensic examination of the actual recording is on-going." Malaysia's ambassador to China had told Chinese families in Beijing as early as March 12 that the last words from the cockpit had been "All right, good night", which experts said was more informal than called for by standard radio procedures.
The pilot's informal hand-off went against standard radio procedures, which would have called for him to read back instructions for contacting the next control centre and include the aircraft's call sign, saidHugh Dibley, a former British Airways pilot and a Fellow of theRoyal Aeronautical Society.

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