standing army

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standing army

the establishment of an army as a body of enlisted, professional, regular soldiers under the direct control of the government. Although approached in form only exceptionally in premodern societies (e.g. the Roman legions), fully professionalized standing armies are a usual feature, and an important basis of the maintenance of the power, of modern NATION STATES. For GIDDENS (1985), the establishment and innovations in the control and tactics of standing armies – the ‘Taylorism of this sphere’ – are a greatly neglected aspect of the process of social development that leads to contemporary societies. See also MILITARY-CIVILIAN RATIO.
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.
First, while Jefferson was wary of standing armies, he was no pacifist.
Concerns about potential abuse date back to the creation of the Constitution, when the founders worried about standing armies and the intimidation of the people at large by an overzealous executive, who might choose to follow the unhappy precedents set by Europe's emperors and monarchs.
Although theNorthhas one of the world's largest standing armies, much of its equipment consists of antiquated Soviet-era designs.
The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to 'the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses,' the report added.
I know the North is practically a Third World country and, although they have one of the largest standing armies in the world, I question if any conflict were to happen, would they have the means to even feed their army?
Standard Model writers will undoubtedly continue to claim that an "armed citizenry" is what Jefferson meant as the constitutional "protection against standing armies.
The prize was endowed by Alfred Nobel, the Swedish inventor of dynamite, who said in his will it was to be awarded to whoever "shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses".
Parrott, in chapter four (echoed by Van Nimwegen in chapter eight and Glete in chapter fourteen), emphasizes that standing armies arose through negotiation and compromise between the state and elites.
US PRESIDENT Thomas Jefferson said almost two hundred years ago "I sincerely believe that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies, and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale".
All these countries have standing armies as big as ours.
Today's adversaries are not national states with standing armies and air forces, clearly marked insignia, and carefully articulated plans for geopolitical expansion and dominance.

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