Stanford achievement test


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Stanford achievement test

[′stan·fərd ə′chēv·mənt ‚test]
(psychology)
A group test employing a primary (grades 2 and 3) and an advanced (grades 4 through 9) examination to measure achievement at various grade levels.
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This would be particularly worrisome if we were using a state accountability exam targeted toward low-achieving students, but it is less of an issue with the Stanford Achievement Tests. Indeed, we found little evidence of students performing near the maximum levels on these tests in either the regression discontinuity or lottery samples.
Results for the Montessori and traditional groups were evaluated in terms of Total Math scores as provided by the Stanford Achievement Test. A within-subjects ANOVA on math scores revealed a significant year effect as well as marginally significant difference by program, but no significant year by program interaction.
The Stanford Achievement Test, 9th Edition: National norming and performance standards for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.
Standardized test scores from the Stanford Achievement Test in language, reading, and math were examined for this group of students.
Harcourt Educational Measurement, for example, offers this warning to states using its popular Stanford Achievement Test: "Test scores may certainly enter into a promotion or retention decision.
An 8th-grader at El Tejon School in Lebec, California, remembered a detail from his Stanford Achievement Test perhaps a little too well recently.
The percentage of students on free lunch programs and the percentage of students scoring above average in the Stanford Achievement Test reading test negatively impacted the SCBM decision.
A User's guide to the ninth edition of the Stanford Achievement Test for educators of deaf and hard of hearing students.
In examining the 1974 norming of the sixth edition of the Stanford Achievement Test and the 1983 norming of the seventh edition, both of which included representative samples of deaf and hard of hearing students, Allen (1986) found that these students lag behind their hearing counterparts in reading and mathematics.
The Stanford Achievement Test is recognized as the first of the large-scale publishers' tests (Haladyna, in press).
For example, they examined Stanford Achievement Test series scores for home-schooled students in Washington State for 1986, 1987, and 1988.
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