Stanzas


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Stanzas

 

a term that in the 18th and 19th centuries referred to a type of verse used in European poetry, for example, by Byron. The term was applied to a short, primarily meditative lyric consisting of strophes (stanzas) restricted in content and composition. Each stanza contained a complete thought and constituted a syntactic period ending in a full stop; the rhymes were nonrepeating. In Russian poetry, the term referred to a poem written inquatrains, generally of iambic tetrameter, with the rhyme scheme abab; it was most common in the first half of the 19th century. An example is Pushkin’s “Stanzas” (”In hope of glory and the good”). The term went out of use in the second half of the 19th century.

V. A. SAPOGOV

References in periodicals archive ?
He wrote his paraphrase of Milton's version at the request of the editors for The New Century Hymnal (1995), who, according to the author, 'wanted to keep the energy and grandeur of Milton, but in an inclusive and more contemporary idiom.' No hymnal includes any exact replication of Milton's metrical psalm, always reducing the number of stanzas and making significant alterations to the original text.
The first stanza also establishes the tension that will pull at the entire poem, and it begins with her pause towards the end of the fourth line followed by "to me." That ee sound, its squeaky hint of dissonance, and the emphasis created by the pause, sets up the reader for the child's grating questions--the why, why, why of childhood, as the speaker tries to situate herself and figure out not just what she has been told, but how it "feels--to me." From this early show of resistance the interrogating me will persist stanza by stanza, growing in importance and maturity; it will also sound a musical note, a small screech that we come to expect as the poem moves forward.
The third and fourth stanzas of the Middle English text show a great deal of corrections, including words inserted above the fine, between words, and over erasures.
Although the fragment 'Richard Saunders' has only two stanzas, it is important as the earliest manifestation of 'Richie Story' (Child 232).
Thomas Meyer begins Caught Between, the first of three long poems in his new book Essay Stanzas, with what seems like a quiet apology:
Dubai -- Shaikha Latifa bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice-chairman of the Dubai Culture and Arts Authority (Dubai Culture), recently attended an inspiring event held under the desert sky called Desert Stanzas.
Of the three stanzas added in 1988, the second has attracted the most attention because in it Cohen recalls his love-making with an unidentified woman and describes sex through religious imagery:
Vali Vijelie--Moda care a iesit/The Fashion That Came Up, stanzas 2 & 3; Sorinel Pustiul--Hai, nevasta, nu ma cicali/ Oh, Wife, Don't Nag Me!; Dorel de la Popesti--Am amanta o pustoaica/I Have a Kiddo for Lover; Adrian, copilul minune/Carmen Serban Printesa mea/My Princess etc.), or by The man's drunkenness (v.
This suggests that the psalm has three stanzas. A refrain (The Lord of hosts is with us ...), occurs after the second and third stanzas.
strophic, 3 stanzas 24 measures per stanza grief and sorrow flee in the gentle light of evening F major; [F.sub.4] to [F.sub.5] Abschied von der Harfe (Salis-Seewis, 1816, D 406)
Stanzas 23 and 56 supply the balance between rule and non-rule, the thesis and antithesis of "The Church Porch," and place the poem, with all its didacticism, into perspective.