Stardust

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Stardust

A NASA probe that was launched Feb. 7 1999 from Cape Canaveral, Florida, to rendezvous with Comet Wild 2 and collect particle samples from its coma for return to the Earth. The Stardust project formed part of NASA's Discovery program, dedicated to making low-cost investigations of the Solar System. It was managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, California. Its target, Comet Wild 2, was discovered in 1978 by the astronomer Paul Wild. It travels around the Sun once every 6.39 years between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Stardust's journey to the comet took it across 3.2 billion kilometers of interplanetary space swept by cosmic rays, solar wind particles, and interstellar dust, and involved a gravity-assist flyby of the Earth in 2001 to speed it on its way. In 2000 and 2002, Stardust collected samples of interstellar dust. On Nov. 2 2002 the probe flew by asteroid (5535) Annefrank. Stardust encountered Comet Wild 2 on Jan. 2 2004, approaching to within 240 km of the comet. Protected by special shields from high-speed collisions with material blown off from the comet as it circles the Sun, the craft collected its samples of microscopic particles from the coma using a device that employs aerogel, a substance formed from silicon dioxide and air, as a particle trap. This device, which had also been used to capture the interstellar dust particles, was then folded down into the sealed sample-return capsule. The Stardust probe's on-board camera also captured detailed images of the comet and transmitted them back to Earth. Stardust returned to the vicinity of Earth on Jan. 15 2006, when it released the capsule, which entered Earth's atmosphere and made a parachute-assisted landing at the Utah Test and Training Range near Salt lake City. After this maneuver, the main Stardust craft entered permanent solar orbit.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
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A Brazilian military patrol of some 30 trekkers will set off on 15 February to the place where a British Lancaster bomber aircraft called Star Dust crashed 53 years ago in mysterious circumstances.
Paul's Seminary in Ottawa; to a half-hearted attempt to drown himself in the Ottawa River; to Nietzsche and the Big Bang theory; to the bully pulpit of the aggressive agnostic; to a denial of objective truth; to an unhealthy obsession with the murderous and suicidal demise of the Order of the Solar Temple, which he wants us to believe is a metaphor for all organized religion; and finally to the belief that we are star dust. This last bit is rich stuff.
ABERDEEN fans reckon Derek McInnes pulled a rabbit out the hat with Stevie May - Graeme Shinnie says his gaffer has sprinkled star dust across the whole squad.
Broadway - is "Bix & Hoagy." The program is built around songs by the 1920s-era cornetist Bix Beiderbecke and his friend, Hoagy Carmichael, and includes such classics as "Georgia on My Mind," and "Star Dust."
The show had a sprinkling of star dust too as coach Jamelia performed a medley of Thank You and Superstar.
Body Shop Star Dust pounds 7 Th is shimmering gold and pink dazzling glitter dust will add sparkle to any look.
CALLUM Tarren, described as a shot-maker in the Seve Ballesteros mould, will be sprinkling his star dust over The Journal Champion of Champions tournament at De Vere Slaley Hall on Sunday week.
But perhaps of greater import to humans--who have a few good millennia left to pursue matters of Earthly interest--is how the discovery of the star dust itself came about: through the cooperation of teams of researchers around the world, sharing instruments and information, questioning and complementing each other's data and observations.
Now an investigation by an Argentinian air force officer has concluded Star Dust crashed because of severe weather, and cleared pilot Capt Reginald Cook of any blame for the crash, which killed all five crew and six passengers.