starter

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starter

1. a device for starting an internal-combustion engine, usually consisting of a powerful electric motor that engages with the flywheel
2. US a person who organizes the timely departure of buses, trains, etc.
3. under starter's orders (of horses in a race) awaiting the start signal

Starter

 

the main unit in the starting system of an engine. A starter increases the speed of rotation of the engine shaft until the starting speed is reached. The starter comprises a motor or engine, a reduction gear, devices for engaging with and disengaging from the shaft of the main engine, and a starting device for internal use (for starters that are not self-contained, for example, gasoline and turbine starters).

Starters are classified according to their principle of operation as inertia, direct-coupled, or combined-drive. In inertia starters, a flywheel is brought to a speed of rotation at which it possesses energy sufficient to rotate the shaft of the main engine upon engagement. Direct-coupled starters are linked directly to the shaft of the main engine. Starters can be of the electric, turbine, compressed-air, hydraulic, or gasoline type.

Electric starters are usually direct-current high-speed motors (up to 13,000 rpm). Starter-generators are also classified as electric starters. During cranking, these units work as starters, but once the engine is in operation they function as generators of electric power. In contrast to other types of starters, starter-generators remain engaged to the shaft of the main engine after the engine has started. The rated power of electric starters can be up to 25 kilowatts (kW), or 35 hp; the operating voltage ranges from 12 to 112 volts (V).

In turbine starters, a turbine is used as the motor. The turbine is rotated by air or by the gases obtained from the combustion of fuel. Depending on the type of feed, turbine starters are classified as compressed-air, combustible-mixture, solid-fuel, and liquid-fuel starters. In compressed-air starters, pressurized air rotates the turbine; the power rating can be as high as 110 kW (150 hp). Combustible-mixture starters, which can be of the gas-turbine or centrifugal-turbine type, are small gas-turbine engines capable of developing a power of up to 300 kW (400 hp). In combustible-mixture turbine starters without compressors, the compressed air for fuel combustion is supplied from cylinders. In solid-fuel turbine starters, which can be of the powder-squib or turbine type, the turbine is driven by the combustion products of a powder charge. In liquid-fuel turbine starters, the turbine is driven by the combustion (decomposition) products of a single-component liquid fuel. The power ratings of solid-fuel and liquid-fuel turbine starters are up to 300 kW (400 hp).

Hydraulic and compressed-air starters are usually pumps or compressors that operate as motors when fed by a liquid or highly pressurized air.

starter

[′stär·dər]
(electricity)
A device used to start an electric motor and to accelerate the motor to normal speed.
(electronics)
An auxiliary control electrode used in a gas tube to establish sufficient ionization to reduce the anode breakdown voltage. Also known as trigger electrode.
(engineering)
A drill used for making the upper part of a hole, the remainder of the hole being made with a drill of smaller gage, known as a follower.
(microbiology)
A culture of microorganisms, either pure or mixed, used to commence a process, for example, cheese manufacture.

starter

1. A device used with a ballast to start an electric-discharge lamp.
2. An electric controller for starting an electric motor, for bringing it up to normal speed, and for stopping it.
3. One of a series of roofing shingles applied beneath the first course of shingles, with a slight overhang at the eaves.

starter

A device which uses electrical, pneumatic or hydraulic energy to turn the engine fast enough for it to start and run normally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The manufacturing of Shrikhand consists of preparation of curd by adding starter culture to milk, preparation of Chhaka by draining the whey and mixing of additional ingredients such as sugar and condiments to obtain desired product.
Bacteriophage resistance capabilities in lactic acid bacteria can be best alternative in phage prone starter cultures (Dalyet al.
Starter cultures made from active dry yeast are easy to use and highly diverse.
These were at the beginning (time zero when the starter culture was added) and at the end of fermentation (hour 24).
Hammes WP (1990) Bacterial starter cultures in food production.
Chalkiness, considered a defect in mouthfeel of some dairy systems, may be influenced by factors such as processing conditions, stabilizers, and starter culture selection (Maiolino, 2002 ; Wszolek et al.
The in-situ production of exopolysaccharides, through the use of starter cultures, has been acknowledged by many to be an acceptable alternative to adding biothickeners to yogurt.
Enumeration of starter cultures in fermented milks.
The contaminated starter culture was distributed internationally; it is unclear why cases related to other tempeh brands did not occur, but a hypothesis is that, unlike other commercial tempeh products, Brand A tempeh is unpasteurized, and thus pathogens remained in the finished product.
It has mould, a thermometer, cheese cloth, rennet tablets, sachets of starter culture and a recipe card.
Yes, I am the proud owner of a Herman the German friendship cake starter culture.