stationkeeping

stationkeeping

[′stā·shən‚keep·iŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
Keeping a satellite in geosynchronous orbit within assigned boundaries, typically within a few tenths of a degree of longitude, generally with the assistance of jet thrusters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming that self-adaption control system is used for stationkeeping of a constellation.
In a series of tweets, the mission management team said the bullet had been fired and the spacecraft was heading back to its stationkeeping position, 12.4 miles above the asteroid.
Once separated from the launch vehicle, the 18 thrusters on the GEO Flight 3 satellite provide stationkeeping, three-axis control and de-spinning of the reaction wheels throughout the mission.
The GOES-R satellite has 16 of these MR-401 rockets onboard providing vehicle attitude control, momentum wheel desaturation and east/west stationkeeping. In addition to the 16 LTRs, Aerojet Rocketdyne also provided the 4.4kW MR-510 electric propulsion subsystem which provides all north/south stationkeeping for the GOES-R mission, as well as end of life decommissioning.
[Stationkeeping] if S1-S2 (i) break to maintain position within a 10 x 10 m box around S2 and velocity lower than 10 cm/s (three axes) if S2-S3 (i) break to maintain position within a 5 x 5m box around S3 and velocity lower than 5 cm/s (three axes) when Stationkeeping is reached goto [ZEM/ZEV Guidance] End.
The effect of orbital perturbations and stationkeeping on geosynchronous orbit has been discussed in [3].
A real-time vision-based stationkeeping system for underwater robotics applications, Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Conference on OCEANS, Vol.
(19) This number is based on a stationkeeping multiplier of 4.4 for Norfolk-based DDG-51s deploying to the European Command's area of responsibility on seven-month deployments.
SS/L's satellites are designed to achieve long useful orbital life through use of bipropellant propulsion and momentum-bias systems for excellent stationkeeping and orbital stability.
The miniscule thrust level is, however, sufficient for the important job of north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) in geosynchronous orbit, said John Beattie, manager of the plasma source research department at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, Calif.
There are generally only three types of measurable partial losses that affect a satellite after launch: transponder failures(s); insufficient stationkeeping fuel, which results in a reduction in mission life; and insufficient power, which results in either an immediate or future quantifiable reduction in the satellite's transponder or mission life.
The recently qualified PPU Mk3 will provide electrical power to the plasma thrusters that handle orbital positioning and stationkeeping on all-electric versions of new telecom satellites.