significance

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significance

[sig′nif·i·kəns]
(mathematics)
The arbitrary rank, priority, or order of relative magnitude assigned to a given position in a number.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was reported yesterday that United States-based Retrophin has achieved statistical significance in the primary efficacy endpoint of a sparsentan phase two study.
Statistical significance is the probability that an effect seen in a study is not likely to be due only to chance variation (Polit & Beck, 2010).
The interim results for overall survival (OS), the other co-primary endpoint, did not reach statistical significance," the company said in the statement.
Statistical significance may be considered borderline by some when p=0.
When asked, how does this advance Bible Code, James stated "Because, it is now possible to determine statistical significance, so we can now say, 'Wow, that keyword is really statistically significant or, O.
This mathematical concept illustrates that the likelihood of finding statistical significance (i.
This reviewer thought he understood what that meant, but after a reading of The Cult of Statistical Significance, that statement has taken on new "significance.
5 days ), 85% experienced a decin PSA compared with 64% of those taking the extract for shorter periods of time, though this difference did not attain statistical significance.
Findings indicate that (a) special education teachers believe that the IEP constitutes the curriculum for students with disabilities; (b) there is no statistical significance based on gender when it comes to which method of curriculum is preferred; and (c) and although future training is desired, there is no statistical significance as to what the focus should be on as it relates to the special education curriculum.
That this analysis was not statistically significant, while the analysis of the AGI as continuous variable was, is not surprising; dichotomizing a continuous variable results in a loss of power, and thus a larger sample size is needed to achieve a similar level of statistical significance (Ragland 2002).

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