Statius


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Statius

Publius Papinius . ?45--96 ad, Roman poet; author of the collection Silvae and of two epics, Thebais and the unfinished Achilleis
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2011), 26 (Fjeldsa & Krabbe 1990) y 29 (Zoonomen Nomenclatural data 2013) subespecies reconocidas desde su descripcion por Statius Muller en 1766 (Rising et.
but for epic poets less well-endowed, poor starvelings,/ what's glory, however great, if that and nothing else?/ Crowds flock to hear that mellifluous voice, his darling/ Theban epic, whenever Statius delights the City/ by promising a performance.
(12) Statius's text reads: "Otia and Silentia with folded wings sit mute in the forecourt and drive the blustering winds from the roof-top, and forbid the branches to sway, and take away their warblings from the birds.
With this innovative diachronic approach, Professor Heerink opens a new dimension of ancient metapoetics and offers many insights into the works of Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus, Virgil, Ovid, Valerius Flaccus, and Statius.
"Statius, Publius Papinius." Hornblower and Spawforth.
Latin poet Statius (Silvae 4.6), followed by his contemporary Martial (Epigrams 9.44), mentions a statuette of Herakles that Alexander was given.
And though the revalorisation of ancient Rome during the Renaissance was always tempered by a wariness of those pagan mores that didn't fit with a Christian worldview, grotesques reminded early modern Europe that Rome was as much represented by the exuberance and eroticism of Apuleius, Ovid and Catullus as by the worthier tones of Virgil or Statius.
Longfellow 338) The transition from the inferior stage of human perception (intellect and art combined) to the superior movement (intellect and religion combined, symbolized in Beatrice, or the lady Filosofia) is prepared in Divina commedia by another Roman poet, Statius, whom Dante and Virgil met first in Canto XXI of "Purgatorio." Statius joins both poets in their ascent, but while Virgil fades from beside Dante in Canto XXIX, Statius appears still accompanying Dante throughout the final four cantos of "Purgatorio." It is because Statius admitted Christianity or was at least Christian in his soul.
The second postgraduate article by Kyle Conrau-Lewis (Yale University), 'The Perversion of Virtue: a case study of Statius' Hippomedon', examines Statius' Thebaid in the context of an apparently minor character, Hippomedon.
Arising from a July 2012 conference held in Delphi, Greece, this volume contains 19 contributions examining, as stated in the editor's introductory essay, not only "...the intimate literary affiliation between the Flavian poets and their Greek literary predecessors, but also the meaning of this interaction within the socio-cultural context of the Flavian age more broadly." Discussion encompasses the role of sleeplessness in Flavian literature; Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica; Statius' epic poems, the Thebaid and Achilleid; Silius Italicus' Punica; and Martial's epigrammatic poetry.