Statoreceptor

statoreceptor

[¦stād·ō·ri′sep·tər]
(physiology)
A sense organ concerned primarily with equilibrium.

Statoreceptor

 

a specialized sensory nerve ending that reacts to changes in the position of the body in space. In lower invertebrates, statoreceptors are located in statocysts, which are vesicles of equilibrium. In fish and some amphibians, statoreceptors are found in lateral line organs. In humans and other vertebrates, the function of statoreceptors is performed by the vestibular apparatus and the organs of sight, the éxteroceptors of the skin, and the proprioceptors of the muscles, tendons, joints, and ligaments.

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The perception of external stimulation in molluscs is captured and channeled by cells and/or highly specialized organs (thermal receptors, statoreceptors, and paleal sensory organ), located mainly on the edge of the bivalve mantle (Zaixo, 2003) which transmit the information from the periphery toward nerve centers (ganglia), that in response synthesize and release different types of chemical messengers or neurosecretions for controlling the activity of target tissues as a specific response (Mathieu et al.).