statue

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statue

a wooden, stone, metal, plaster, or other kind of sculpture of a human or animal figure, usually life-size or larger

Statue

A form of likeness sculpted, modeled, carved, or cast in material such as stone, clay, wood, or bronze.

What does it mean when you dream about a statue?

People that we know who appear in dreams as statues may indicate that relationships are inflexible and that communication has reached a standstill. If the dreamer is a statue it may mean that the true self has become far removed from reality.

References in classic literature ?
Then the Wizard made the magic pass and spoke the magic word before the statue of Unc Nunkie.
He wouldn't potter about in a garden excavating the pedestals of statues.
I saw all the stone statues standing in the moonlight; and I myself was like one of those stone statues walking.
Every man of them ought to have a statue, and on the pedestal words like those of the noblest ruffian of the Revolution: 'Que mon nom soit fletri; que la France soit libre.
For the time, it is the only thing worth naming to do that,--be it a sonnet, an opera, a landscape, a statue, an oration, the plan of a temple, of a campaign, or of a voyage of discovery.
But the statue will look cold and false before that new activity which needs to roll through all things, and is impatient of counterfeits and things not alive.
Men are not well pleased with the figure they make in their own imaginations, and they flee to art, and convey their better sense in an oratorio, a statue, or a picture.
Nothing was to be heard but imprecations on the Flemish, the provost of the merchants, the Cardinal de Bourbon, the bailiff of the courts, Madame Marguerite of Austria, the sergeants with their rods, the cold, the heat, the bad weather, the Bishop of Paris, the Pope of the Fools, the pillars, the statues, that closed door, that open window; all to the vast amusement of a band of scholars and lackeys scattered through the mass, who mingled with all this discontent their teasing remarks, and their malicious suggestions, and pricked the general bad temper with a pin, so to speak.
The bailiff's four sergeants were still there, stiff, motionless, as painted statues.
When I was alive and had a human heart," answered the statue, "I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the Palace of Sans- Souci, where sorrow is not allowed to enter.
Far away," continued the statue in a low musical voice, "far away in a little street there is a poor house.
At that moment a curious crack sounded inside the statue, as if something had broken.