Stave church

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Related to Stave churches: Stavkirke

Stave church

A Scandinavian church of the 12th and 13th centuries constructed entirely of wood with few windows and a steep roof; highly original in structure with fantastic semipagan decorative features.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

stave church

stave church
A Scandinavian wooden church with vertical planks forming the walls.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discussion of Norway's stave churches, whose pagan and Christian elements dovetail with Solness's aspirations, is heady stuff.
The kiosk will be clad in driftwood gathered from the Welsh coastline to create a shingle finish, "inspired by the shingled stave churches of Norway and the ad hoc beach shacks of 1960s west coast America".
In this illustrated essay, we can see how beliefs about Yggdrasil and Ragnarok are incorporated and transformed in the design and ornamentation of the unusual stave churches of Norway.
Copenhagen's heady blend of designer stores, palaces and funfair parks are in stark contrast with Oslo's Vigeland statues, Stave churches and Viking long boats.
In the nineteenth century, Pietists in Norway burned some of the celebrated ancient stave churches as their grotesque timber carvings were, again, considered idolatrous.
In Nordic stave churches, the mystery of the forest was fixed and explained as 'dark light'.
I will try to substantiate this interpretation by looking at three aspects of the stave church: the shape, the portals and door, and the interior; and by interpreting several of the allusions and symbols found in the poetic form of stave churches, principally in that of Borgund in connection with shape, Urnes in connection with the portal, and Uvdal from the point of view of the interior.
Its church dates back to the first part of the twelfth century and is one of the first stone places of worship in the whole country (the first timber stave churches are a little earlier).
Norwegian tradition can be traced from medieval stave churches through folk architecture, National Romanticism's dragon style, Functionalism's concrete skeletons to Fehn's characteristic symbiosis of wood and masonry'(p40).(10)