Steiner triple system

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Steiner triple system

[¦stīn·ər ¦trip·əl ′sis·təm]
(mathematics)
A balanced incomplete block design in which the number k of distinct elements in each block equals 3, and the number λ of blocks in which each combination of elements occurs together equals 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
A natural problem is to find a Steiner System on a set of 7 or 9 letters such that each line can be rearranged to form a word.
In keeping with the spirit of this article, one may then try to find a Steiner System of words out of the very letters that express the possible orders of Steiner Systems, i.e.
Take the ones that point downwards and these will form the Steiner System given earlier.
Choose a direction for each type and they will make up a Steiner System. For example in the second case there are small triangles (e.g.
I personally do not think it is effective especially if we think of learning foreign languages, which in the Steiner system are usually two.
In the Steiner system, it is the teacher who sees to such matters.
Many claim Steiner was a crackpot, but universities compete for high school students educated in the Waldorf system (another Steiner system that defies the rational mind.) Maybe grapes and people who have been nurtured that way have something special.
The children, aged between three-and-a-half and six-and-a-half, have no reading books or sums to do because the Steiner system believes in an unhurried approach to formal lessons.
Parent Ulrike Engelbrecht grew up in Germany where children start school late and chose the Steiner system for her own children, Pia, four, and two-year-old Cai.
The Rudolph Steiner system of organic farming (called biodynamics), which they learned at UC Santa Cruz, is a mainstay, but they also draw on lessons learned from Dutch horticulture.
Currently in Wales there is only very limited kindergarten, primary and junior provision within the Steiner system. But, say Steiner teachers, despite the alternative methods their former pupils who enter mainstream education at sec-ondary school level do not have problems adapting to the National Curriculum.