Sterculiaceae


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Related to Sterculiaceae: Thymelaeaceae

Sterculiaceae

[stər‚kyü·lē′ās·ē]
(botany)
A family of dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of the order Malvales distinguished by imbricate or contorted petals, bilocular anthers, and ten to numerous stamens arranged in two or more whorls.

Sterculiaceae

 

a family of dicotyledonous plants including trees, shrubs, and, less frequently, herbs. The flowers, which are usually regular and bisexual, are gathered in compound inflorescences. The five or, less frequently, three sepals are fused at the base. There are usually five petals; often the petals are reduced or absent altogether. The stamens are in two whorls; the ones in the outer whorl often are transformed into stamenodia or do not develop at all. The filaments of the stamens merge to form the style. In many species the stamens and pistil extend over the perianth (on the androgynophore). The ovary usually consists of five carpels. The fruits vary in shape, sometimes dividing into separate fruitlets. There are about 1,000 species, embracing more than 60 genera. The plants are found chiefly in the tropics of both hemispheres. Species of the genera Theobromus (cacao), Cola, and Sterculia are of practical significance.

References in periodicals archive ?
Monachino y Moldenke (1940) describieron el genero monotipico Veeresia Monachino (1940) del estado de Hidalgo, ubicandolo dentro de la familia Sterculiaceae, subtribu Helicterereae y relacionandolo con el genero asiatico Reevesia Lindl.
Ashton 2006 Habitat associations of Sterculiaceae trees in a Bornean rain forest plot.
Entretanto, outras familias como Araliaceae, Burseraceae, Boraginaceae, Bignoniaceae, Caryocariaceae, Cecropiaceae, Celastraceae, Combretaceae, Dychapetalaceae, Elaeocarpaceae, Erythroxylaceae, Linaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Ochnaceae, Olacaceae, Rhabdodendraceae, Rhizophoraceae, Sterculiaceae e Vochysiaceae, se fizeram presentes com apenas uma especie, alcancando 15,1% do total de especies.
Among the families Palmae and Sterculiaceae have been distinguished, each one with five described species.
Cocoa comes from the cacao tree, a plant from the sterculiaceae family, which craves hot and humid weather conditions.
For example, some Dysdercus bugs change their feeding habits: during the wet season they eat the seeds of various species of Bombacaceae (Bombacopsis, Ceiba and Pseudobombax) and Sterculiaceae (Ster-culia), whereas during the dry season they eat the tender flowers and fruits of herbaceous and bushy members of the Malvaceae, such as Mal-vaviscus arboreus and several species of Sida and Wissadula.
Host plant data on Hedyloidea are scarce but indicate that Sterculiaceae (Rosid 2) is the most important host plant group.
CES (ber; B, OA) Sterculiaceae Ayenia limitaris Cristobal MST (cap; B, OA) Melochia pyramidata L.
found in Arabia are known to be polyphagous on various low Malvaceae (mallow family) and Sterculiaceae (cacao family), and to a lesser degree Tiliaceae (linden family), although they may also use other plants (Walker & Pittaway 1987; Kehimkar 2008; Larsen pers.