stereoscopy

(redirected from Stereoview)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Stereoscopy

The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes, producing a visual experience of the third dimension, that is, a vivid perception of the relative distances of objects in space. In this experience the observer seems to see the space between the objects located at different distances from the eyes.

Stereopsis, or stereoscopic vision, is believed to have an innate origin in the anatomic and physiologic structures of the retinas of the eyes and the visual cortex. It is present in normal binocular vision because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object points in space are slightly different in the two eyes. The stereoscope, with which different pictures can be presented to each eye, demonstrates the fundamental difference between stereoscopic perception of depth and the conception of depth and distance from the monocular view. See Vision

stereoscopy

[‚ster·ē′äs·kə·pē]
(physiology)
The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes in which there is a vivid perception of the distances of objects from the viewer; it is present because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object are slightly different in the two eyes. Also known as stereopsis; stereoscopic vision.

stereoscopy

stereoscopy
The art and science that deals with the use of binocular vision for the observation of a pair of overlapping photographs or other perspective views. It also deals with the methods by which viewing is produced.
References in periodicals archive ?
As with stereoviews, every island landmark, vista, and historic site was available.
They became so popular that virtually every Victorian home--regardless of class--had one, along with a collection of images, known as stereoviews, stereograms, or simply stereos or views.
Manitoba's first stereoviews were created by the Boundary Commission of 1872-74, during which the line separating prairie Canada from the USA was defined.
By the early twentieth century, stereoviews had become mass-produced commodities marketed by large companies such as the Keystone View Company, Underwood & Underwood, and the H.
Ransom's profession as an artist, printer, and engraver probably helped in his creation of excellent stereoviews of day-to-day family life in the 1910s.
The rise of radio and talking movies around the same time was not a coincidence; they provided an experience that was perhaps more realistic than static and silent stereoviews. But interest in stereoscopy did not die; indeed, the paper "View-Master" disks containing small stereoscopic images appeared in the 1940s, were very popular in the 1950s and '60, and are still sold today.
Stereoviews were the first visual "mass medium" and they exposed vast numbers of people to the world around them, from current events and celebrities, to the battlefield horrors of the American Civil War, to the natural wonders of land and water, to exotic and foreign cultures that few people could experience first-hand.