Stern

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Related to Sterns: NWJ

stern

1. the rear or after part of a vessel, opposite the bow or stem
2. the tail of certain breeds of dog, such as the foxhound or beagle

Stern

Isaac. 1920--2001, US concert violinist, born in (what is now) Ukraine

Stern

 

the rear end of a vessel (boat).

The shape of the underwater part of the stern affects the resistance of the water to the movement of the vessel, maneuverability, and the working conditions of the driving mechanism, and the configuration of the above-water part determines the accommodation of the ship gear (steering, mooring, and towing equipment) and ship compartments (quarters). The cruiser stern is the most common for modern oceangoing transport vessels; the ice-breaker stern is a type of cruiser stern. The ordinary stern with a counter (stern overhang) is most often found on old ocean and river vessels; the transom stern is used on trailer ships, container ships, trawlers, and the like. The underwater part of the stern of modern seagoing vessels is usually made with an open sternpost.

stern

[stərn]
(naval architecture)
The aftermost part of a ship.
References in classic literature ?
The stern of the skiff was not six feet away, and they were laughing at me derisively as they ducked under the ship's stern.
But we had drawn them out of safety, and Charley, from his place in the stern-sheets, reached over and clutched the stern of the skiff.
The dandy, in the stern, with a careless look upward, tried with his foot to shove over the green leaves so as to cover the out-jutting butts of several rifles, but made the matter worse by exposing them more fully.
It escaped his attention, for he was glancing over the stern at something the boat had in tow.
His stern face could not stay little Violet, and on through the long hall she went, heedless of the snow that gathered on her feet, and the bleak wind that blew around her; while the King with wondering eyes looked on the golden light that played upon the dark walls as she passed.
In making its circle to come back, the cow lost her bearings sufficiently to miss the stern of the Mary Turner by twenty feet.
After Mass, when they had finished their coffee in the dining room where the loose covers had been removed from the furniture, a servant announced that the carriage was ready, and Marya Dmitrievna rose with a stern air.
On the other hand, a penalty which, in our days, would infer a degree of mocking infamy and ridicule, might then be invested with almost as stern a dignity as the punishment of death itself.