Stesichorus


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Stesichorus

(stēsĭk`ərəs), fl. c.600 B.C., Greek lyric poet. He lived at Himera, Sicily, and seems to have been originally named Tisias or Teisias. Legend says he invented the choral "heroic hymn" and added the epode to the Greek strophe and antistrophe, thenceforth much used (e.g., by the tragedians and by PindarPindar
, 518?–c.438 B.C., Greek poet, generally regarded as the greatest Greek lyric poet. A Boeotian of noble birth, he lived principally at Thebes. He traveled widely, staying for some time at Athens and in Sicily at the court of Hiero I at Syracuse and also at Acragas
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 and IbycusIbycus
, fl. before 500 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Rhegium, S Italy. The extant fragments of his work contain the earliest-known example of the triadic choral lyric. He spent some time at the court of Polycrates of Samos.
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). Fragments of his verse have survived.
References in classic literature ?
5) She is said to have given birth to the lyrist Stesichorus.
For they are mere shadows and pictures of the true, and are coloured by contrast, which exaggerates both light and shade, and so they implant in the minds of fools insane desires of themselves; and they are fought about as Stesichorus says that the Greeks fought about the shadow of Helen at Troy in ignorance of the truth.
Greek poet Stesichorus for incorporation into a canto, engages in what Kern calls "creative reading," an Emmersonian practice whereby reading is not a passive activity, but a highly personal and imaginative act.
This anxiety is also retrospectively explored in Euripides' Helen, in the words of Menelaus' attendant when he discovers that the prize they had believed to be worth fighting and dying for at Troy was no more than dust and smoke, a phantom that took the place of Helen, while she remained in Egypt in this version of the story that Euripides shares with Herodotus and Stesichorus (744-751):
A large inscription confirms as much: the overall topic is said to be 'Trojan', while the literary subjects range from the 'Ilioupersis [destruction of Troy] according to Stesichorus, the Iliad by Homer, the Aethiopis by Arctinus of Miletus, and the Little Iliad as told by Lesches of Pyrrha'.
And are not the pleasures with which they dwell inevitably commingled with pains, phantoms of true pleasure, illusions of shadow-painting, so colored by contrary juxtaposition as to seem intense in either kind, and to beget mad loves of themselves in senseless souls, and to be fought for, as Stesichorus says the wraith of Helen was fought for at Troy through ignorance of the truth?
Cydonian quinces, fruits sacred to Aphrodite, were offered to brides on their wedding night to awaken sexual desire in them for their husbands (see Stesichorus Fragment 187, and a prescription by Solon mentioned in Plutarch's Solon 20.
Whatever work she engages, from Stesichorus to Antonioni, she makes her own; in Pound's terms, she makes it new.
Campbell, Greek Lyric III: Stesichorus, Ibycus, Simonides, and Others, Loeb Classical Library [Cambridge, Mass.
The deaths of Laocoon and Priam, the theophany, and the death of Cruesa are the high points, he says, but he also pay special attention to the Helen episode, Stesichorus, and the Tabula Iliaca Captolina.
This version, or Steisichorus' similar one that has the Greeks and the Trojans fighting over Helen's phantom (eidolon; Stesichorus fr.