Stigand


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Stigand

(stĭg`ənd), d. 1072, English prelate. He held simultaneously the sees of Winchester and Canterbury from 1052 though official recognition of this did not come until 1058 from Benedict X, an antipope. He has generally been cast as an opportunist, useful to Edward the Confessor (he negotiated the peace between Edward and Earl Godwin in 1052). Stigand welcomed William I and continued in his offices until a papal commission under Alexander II replaced him (1070) with Lanfranc.
References in classic literature ?
"Edwin and Morcar, the earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable--"'
Stigand (1877-1919) was possibly the most outspoken smallbore fan, and his advocacy of the 6.5mm in his Hunting the Elephant in Africa (1913) did much to fuel the debate.
This cartridge sparked the first "small-bore debate." The deep-penetrating 6.5mm solids were used for game up to elephant by many early hunters, but the most outspoken champion of the 6.5mm for the largest game was Chauncy Hugh Stigand, author of "Hunting the Elephant in Africa" (1913).
Big game hunters Chauncey Stigand and Denis Lyell wrote: '[Crocodiles] kill a number of natives annually on the big rivers, and so we would generally take a long shot at one of these animals, even if there is no chance of getting the body'.
Even William Stigand, whose 1861 attack on Aurora Leigh in the Edinburgh Review is often quoted (inaccurately) as representative of Victorian critical opinion, found "Wine of Cyprus" one of the "prettiest lyrics" written by "Mrs.
and even Stigand the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury found it advisable'-
Rumble, "From Winchester to Canterbury: AElfheah and Stigand--Bishops, Archbishops and Victims," Leaders of the Anglo-Saxon Church: From Bede to Stigand, ed.
Stigand viewed the poem as the greatest religious classic of the race (Hichens 1972:9).
It's not a safari book in the classic sense of accounts by such 19th- and early 20th-century adventurers as Frederick Selous, Captain Stigand, or W.
The Stigand version of the Pate Chronicle records (two hundred years after the Portuguese presence at Pate) that, in addition to the Portuguese setting up a fandikani, which "in the language of the Portuguese means 'customs,'" (Port.
Stigand, Bishop of Winchester, began the construction of the Palace, which was modified and developed by his successors.
Stigand [1894; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1968]; Lev Ginsberg, History of the Violoncello, trans.