stigmatic

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stigmatic

[stig′mad·ik]
(optics)
Property of an optical system whose focal power is the same in all meridians.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper only addresses female stigmatics and self-cutters because this practice is more prevalent in young women and their close association to the intense emotional quest for transcendence--the modification of one self to another, "the diversion of pain to another .
8) It is important to note that the Catholic Church remains ambiguous about the validity of the various stigmatics and does not, then or now, consider possession of the stigmata an "incontestable" miracle that puts the recipient on the fast track to sainthood.
I was thinking about stigmatics and I knew I wanted to do something about quilts, something about slavery.
Although Mariette had not been physically ill prior to her experience of the stigmata, I would suggest that her sister's illness and her own psychological response to it provided a context of illness analogous to that experienced by Elisabeth and other medieval stigmatics.
Imagine, if you will, a photographic representation of the twentieth-century stigmatic Therese Neumann.
80) Boyer linked Rose to various other stigmatics, both past and present: Catherine Emmerich, Theresa Neumann and Louise Lateau appear in the biography most often.
Well-known stigmatics of the "victim soul" heyday include Louise Lateau of Belgium; Gemma Galgani, Benigna Consolata Ferrero, and Padre Pio of Italy; Teresa Higginson of England; Josefa Menendez, Marie-Therese Noblet, and Marthe Robin of France; Alexandrina da Costa of Portugal; Theresa Neumann of Bavaria; and Rose Ferron of the United States.
But unlike other stigmatics in history, who have been devoutly religious, hairdresser Frankie Paige is an unbeliever - a bit of a wild child in fact.
This meticulously researched, gracefully articulated biography reveals the religious fervor of 14th-century Europe, which was fueled by charismatics, hermits, itinerant preachers, and a smattering of stigmatics.
Kane is now working on a broad study of modern female stigmatics in Europe and America.
Well-known stigmatics of this century include Therese Neumann of Germany and Padre Pio of Italy.