stigmatic

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stigmatic

[stig′mad·ik]
(optics)
Property of an optical system whose focal power is the same in all meridians.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most stigmatics are mystics with a poignant faith to share in God's suffering.
Available Christian literature on stigmatics revealed that only Father Pio of Pietrelcina had shoulder wounds.
Her treatment of stigmata, for instance, while one of my favorite chapters and replete with fascinating cases and evidence, would have nevertheless greatly benefitted from Krippner's (2002) thorough review of other cases (including his own case study of a modern Brazilian stigmatic) and diverse explanations she doesn't mention.
Stigmatics were either "saints" enveloped by the loving arms of Jesus, or "witches" besought and beaten by demons or, as in the case of St.
as opposed to a physical one." Consistent with the prominence of bleeding in popular depictions of Christ's wounds, stigmatics have often exhibited not only bruising, but also open wounds that bled profusely.
I was thinking about stigmatics and I knew I wanted to do something about quilts, something about slavery.
Mariette's passionate desire to find happiness by sharing Christ's pain is consistent with what Bynum reports about the experiences of medieval stigmatics: Horrible pain ...
Well-known stigmatics of the "victim soul" heyday include Louise Lateau of Belgium; Gemma Galgani, Benigna Consolata Ferrero, and Padre Pio of Italy; Teresa Higginson of England; Josefa Menendez, Marie-Therese Noblet, and Marthe Robin of France; Alexandrina da Costa of Portugal; Theresa Neumann of Bavaria; and Rose Ferron of the United States.
Well-known stigmatics of this century include Therese Neumann of Germany and Padre Pio of Italy.
She is not the first stigmatic female in Annex, Manitoba, but the public nature of her bleeding attracts attention to the town.
Allegedly a stigmatic in the 1920s and `30s, her community had hoped she would become the first Irish-American saint.