Stilicho


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Stilicho

Flavius . ?365--408 ad, Roman general and statesman, born a Vandal. As the guardian of Emperor Theodosius' son Honorius, he was effective ruler of the Western Roman Empire (395--408), which he defended against the Visigoths
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Claudian alludes to the Gigantomachy to describe the opponents of Stilicho in his Panegyricus de tertio consulatu Honorii Augusti:
Stilicho, the general and Consul in the West under the Western Emperor Honorius, first parried Alaric, then partnered with him in an aborted campaign against the Eastern Emperor.
(20) But the reference is more plausibly to Honorius and Stilicho, and thus provides no terminus ante quem for the transfer.
An epigram (Deprecatio ad Hadrianum) on his superior, the Greek Hadrianus, put him in jeopardy of losing his civil post; but, by assiduously praising Stilicho, minister of the Western emperor Flavius Honorius, and denouncing his rivals at the court of Flavius Arcadius, he gained high rank.
Violent and ruthless, Alaric was an Arian Christian and not the uncouth barbarian of popular imagination; although a charismatic leader and a capable tactician, he was no match for Stilicho on the battlefield.
She covers a forgotten empress, the "most noble" princess 379-395, orphan princess in Stilicho's shadow 395-408, held hostage by the Goths 408-412, a queen of the Visigoths 411-416, wife and mother in Ravenna 416-424, empress of the Romans 424-437, the empress mother and her children 438-455, and the fall of the Western Empire 455-476.
In the West, real power was legitimately in the hands of the commander-in-chief Stilicho, of Vandal origin, who had been appointed guardian of the boy-emperor Honorius.
Although the authors concentrate their attention on the reign of Theodosius the Great and the regime of Stilicho, their book appears to be an extended essay on the fall of the Roman Empire in the west.
There were the causes celebres of the fallen ministers Eutropius in 398 and Stilicho in 408, both attempting to save their lives by seeking asylum in a church.
There he describes how Theodosius the Great, after entrusting the care of his two sons to Stilicho on his death-bed, ascends to heaven in the form of a star, while the constellations make room to welcome him:
Within this framework, they consider such topics as whether literary history was a fourth-century Roman invention, paideia and patronage in Cappadocia, lobbying through literature: Libanius For the Teachers (Oration 31), failings of the narrative in Ammianus Marcellinus, Stilicho as a literary construct in the poetry of Claudian, and sermons and social status in Constantinople under the Theodosian dynasty.