Stilicho


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Stilicho

Flavius . ?365--408 ad, Roman general and statesman, born a Vandal. As the guardian of Emperor Theodosius' son Honorius, he was effective ruler of the Western Roman Empire (395--408), which he defended against the Visigoths
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Stilicho, an advisor of the emperor Theodosius I, controlled the young emperor Honorius as regent and also tried to claim authority over the young emperor Arcadius in the east.
The usual suspects are here--More, Colet, Medwall, Elyot--but so are good readings of the Somnium Vigilantis, of Thomas Chaundler's Libellus, and of Osbern Bokenham; Stilicho enters as a resonant exemplum (the savvy arguments of A.
Based at the Court of Milan, he wrote a series of panegyrics celebrating Stilicho, the general who ruled the West from 395 to 408.
Claudian alludes to the Gigantomachy to describe the opponents of Stilicho in his Panegyricus de tertio consulatu Honorii Augusti:
4) Shippey (225) cites Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire as possibly yielding a name-model for Radagast in "Radagaisus," the Gothic leader defeated by the "barbarian" Imperial generalissimo Stilicho in 405 AD.
The son of a barbarian father in the service of Rome and a Roman mother, Stilicho was himself emblematic of the barbarian encroachment on the empire.
Stilicho advised payment, but he was falling out of favor with the emperor and, in fact, was executed in 408.
He also contributes, with his Companion, to a fine tradition of handbooks on Roman Britain, setting out deftly introduced and amply annotated lists of epigraphy (and, where appropriate, Classical writers' references) on: the army; civilian organization; offices and occupations; the emperors; buildings; roads (milestones); spirits and cults; and people (Vespasian to Stilicho, Togidubnus to Pelagius, nor forgetting Flavius Cerealis out on Hadrian's Wall).
Although the authors concentrate their attention on the reign of Theodosius the Great and the regime of Stilicho, their book appears to be an extended essay on the fall of the Roman Empire in the west.
The chapter on Stilicho deals adequately with Stilicho's political situation, Alaric's position and ambitions, and the conflicts between Alaric and Stilicho.