Stock Dove


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Related to Stock Dove: wood pigeon

Stock Dove

 

(Columba oenas), a bird of the family Columbidae. Somewhat smaller than the domestic pigeon (weighing about 250 g), it has grayish blue plumage, with a metallic gloss on the neck and crop. The beak is reddish with a yellow cere.

The stock dove is distributed in Europe, northwestern Africa, and Asia. In the USSR it is found from the western borders to the Altai and Middle Asia. In the north it is a migratory bird, and in the south, a settled bird. It lives in deciduous forests and gardens, nesting in tree hollows, in holes on cliffs, and more rarely on the branches of trees. The stock dove lays two clutches of two eggs each a year; the eggs are incubated 16–18 days. The nestlings spend about one month in the nest. The stock dove feeds on seeds. It is a game bird.

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| The top five most "valued" economic species (summer population): 1 Chaf finch; 2 House Sparrow; 3 Red-legged partridge; 4 Skylark; 5 Stock dove.
What pleasing ambiguity is in the use of 'woos' for the call of the stock dove. 'Woos' refers both to the call and to one of the purposes of it, courtship.
Last month on Kirkby Moss, Chris had buzzard, oystercatcher, two jay, blackcap, corn bunting, stock dove and 200 woodpigeons.
However, farmland specialists like the stock dove and goldfinch increased by more than 50%.
I moved away from the drumming woodpecker into a quieter corner, where the mournful "song" of a stock dove drifted through the trees.
A bird flew in and landed on the rock, way too big, a stock dove, nice view though.
Species doing particularly well included Goldfinch, Stock Dove and Tree Sparrow.
Figures published by Defra show that the long-term decline in farmland birds has stabilised and has reversed for a number of species in recent years, such as the greenfinch and stock dove.
Corn buntings, grey partridge, turtle doves and tree sparrows have all suffered declines of more than 90% since 1970, though others such as stock doves and goldfinches saw populations double.
The box that the barn owls call home was put up in 2006, but since then only stock doves have used it to breed.
Barn owl nestboxes in particular seem to attract other tenants, with reports of the owls sharing with species including jackdaws, kestrels and stock doves.
Barn owl nest boxes seem to attract the most unusual tenants, with reports of the generous bird of prey sharing their nest boxes with birds like jackdaws, kestrels and stock doves.