Stone Fish


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Stone Fish

 

(in Russian, kamennye ryby) stone images of fish (45 to 10 cm or less) widespread in Eastern Siberia (primarily along the western shores of Lake Baikal and in the Angara River valley) during the Neolithic period. The small, realistically fashioned stone fish had holes and were evidently used as lures for ice fishing. Large and fanciful fish figures were associated with magical fishing rituals.

REFERENCES

Okladnikov, A. P. “Kammenye ryby.” In the collection Sovetskaia ar-kheologiia, vol. 1. Moscow, 1936.
Okladnikov, A. P. “K voprosu o naznachenii neoliticheskikh kam-menykh ryb iz Sibiri.” In the book Materialy i issledovaniia po ar-kheologii SSSR, no. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1941.
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