Burhinidae

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Burhinidae

[byü′rin·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The thick-knees or stone curlews, a family of the avian order Charadriiformes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Summary: Beach stone-curlews are under threat from feral foxes in New South Wales
"Excessive trapping of migrating birds, particularly the stone-curlew, which is exposed to extinction, has a serious impact on the wild life and introduces changes to birds' regular actions."
A resident breeder on the coastline of south-east Iran, and further east in Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka into South-east Asia (Robson, 2000), Great Stone-curlew was included in a list of birds predicted to occur in the United Arab Emirates, 'particularly (to) the East Coast', over twenty years ago (Richardson and Bannon 1991).
Most conservation successes are with rarer species including corncrake and stone-curlew.
Sultan Alwan, Assistant Under-Secretary for the Regions Sector at MoCCE, said: "The ministry has recently noticed that some people use electronic devices that imitate the voice of the stone-curlew to attract large numbers of these birds over long distances in order to catch them easily."
RSPB conservation director Dr Mark Avery said: "Over the last decade we've enjoyed some cracking conservation successes, including removing some threatened species from the red list and increasing populations of red kite, bittern, avocet, osprey, stone-curlew and cirl bunting.
RARE birds such as the stone-curlew face a bleak future unless the government replaces set-aside land with schemes that will protect wildlife, the RSPB warned this week.
Among the success stories are the otter, which has seen 'continued increases in numbers and range', the stone-curlew, which has enjoyed a 56% increase in breeding pairs over five years to 233 pairs, and the dormouse, which has been successfully reintroduced to a number of areas where it had disappeared.
Summary: Violating hunting ban on stone-curlew can result in six-month prison term, fine
On a happier note, early counts show that the Little Terns at Gronant are doing well, joined at the weekend by two unusual visitors: a Stone-curlew and a Broad-billed Sandpiper, the latter relocating at Kinmel Bay on Monday evening.