Stonefish


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stonefish

 

(Synanceia verrucosa), a fish of the Synance-jidae family of the order Scleroparei. Its naked skin is covered with warts and growths. It lives in the tropics of the Indian and pacific oceans and in the Red Sea. Length, up to 40 cm.

At the base of the spiny rays of the dorsal fin the stonefish has paired poisonous cutaneous glands in the form of a compact mass of serous cells, distributed in warts on each side of the spines. A prick of its spines is extremely dangerous and occasionally fatal. The meat of the stonefish is used for food.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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(4-6) Although scorpaenid venoms contain similar mixtures of enzymes and proteins, they do differ in potencies with stonefish venom being the most potent and capable of fatal envenomation, and lionfish venom being the least potent.
How does the stonefish's appearance help it hide from predators?
As a single mother of two, Stonefish said showing her kids how important college is played a big role in her going back to school.
And I can't leave without saying good-bye to the stonefish. Only the astute visitor notices the stonefish.
We wade waist deep through water as warm as a bath, Les pointing out schools of mullet, schools of goatfish, a stonefish, a pipefish.
Selective depletion of clear synaptic vesicles and enhanced quantal transmitter release at frog motor nerve endings produced by trachynilysin, a protein toxin isolated from stonefish (Synanceia trachynis).
NEIGHBOURS: Toadie (left) and Stonefish gear up for a big night out.
Although there is an antivenin available for another member of the scorpionfish category, the stonefish, it does not work for lionfish.
In another, he demonstrates how a stonefish, a dark, craggy creature resembling a rock, can inject venom from its dorsal spines into a human foot.
Stonefish stands on its own merits, the work of a writer of mature craft, varied experience of life, and with a clear vision of life or perhaps sets of values.
This is said to ensure that the feet remain tough enough, even after prolonged soaking, to withstand the sharp edges of oyster shells and coral tines and, more importantly, the deadly spines of the stonefish (Synencaja horrida).