Stool Shoots and Root Suckers

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stool Shoots and Root Suckers

 

sprouts produced from adventitious buds on the stump and roots, respectively, of a broadleaf tree (oak, elm, birch, linden, ash). Frequently, dormant buds located somewhat above the stump also form shoots. Coniferous trees very rarely form stool shoots and root suckers.

The sprouts are usually large; their size is explained by the vast supply of nutrients from the parent plant. The large leaves often have an unusual form and are similar to the leaves of the seedlings. Many trees, such as lindens and chestnuts, produce stool shoots and root suckers until they are very old. The trees that develop from the sprouts do not have as long a life-span as the parent plant, and their wood is inferior in quality. Stool shoots and root suckers are used in silviculture, landscaping, and gardening. Many perennial plants form from root suckers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.