storm trooper

(redirected from Storm Troops)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

storm trooper

History a member of the Nazi Sturmabteilung (SA)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These weapons were distributed to Storm Troops and played an important role in German counterattacks at the Somme.
Liddell Hart, one of Britain's foremost military historians, wrote: "Regarding the Canadians as Storm Troops, the Germans greeted their appearance as an omen of a coming attack." To deceive them the Canadians led the enemy to believe they were about to launch a major offensive in Belgium but secretly moved into positions at Amiens just hours before the attack.
Documents cited by the German magazine Stern in an expose on Harrer just before the film's release showed that at a time when Nazi organisations were still banned in Austria, Harrer - then just 21 - joined Adolf Hitler's underground SA storm troops in Austria in 1933.
The model of storm troops playing a dominant role, developed in 1920s Italy and perfected in 1930s Germany, is out of date, anyway, as the 1970s experiences of Chile and Argentina demonstrate.
It was the biggest storm troops had seen since they began to arrive in the theatre of operations in January.
Machtan throws a new light on everything from Hitler's liquidation of Ernst Rohm's storm troops to the Nazis' destruction of Magnus Hirschfeld's fledgling gay rights movement to the tragic roundup and murder of thou sands of German gays in the camps.
Military experts here predict the Alliance will concentrate on the destruction of bin Laden's highly-motivated storm troops who are stretched out across trenches on the Shomali Plains.
Baden Powell admired 2,500 Rover Scouts, `the storm troops of the larger army', gathered at a Moot to climb mountains: `And it is a ripping good sport'.
Ernst Junger therefore became after 1933 the quintessential so-called "internal emigrant." Yet, while remaining aloof, he also composed a remarkable allegorical novel, On the Marble Cliffs (1939), which denounced the totalitarian state in general, the selfsame political entity Junger had advocated in his futuristic 1932 paen to the wartime front-soldiers and their leaders (Nevin: "cybernetic storm troops"), The Worker.