Storytelling

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Storytelling

Aesop
semi-legendary fabulist of ancient Greece. [Gk. Lit.: Harvey, 10]
Münchäusen
Baron traveler grossly embellishes his experiences. [Ger. Lit.: Harvey, 565]
Mother Goose
originally a fictitious nursery rhyme spinner from Perrault, later a Bostonian authoress. [Fr. Lit.: Brewer Handbook, 732]
Odysseus
wily teller of tales. [Gk. Legend: Odyssey]
Ovid
(Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 B.C.—A.D. 17) great storyteller of classical mythology. [Rom. Lit.: Zimmerman, 187]
Remus, Uncle
narrator of animal tales in Old South. [Am. Lit.: Nights with Uncle Remus]
Sandy
told endless tales as she and Boss traveled. [Am. Lit.: A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court]
Scheherazade
forestalls her execution with 1,001 tales. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights]
Watson, Dr. John H.
chronicles Sherlock Holmes’s cases. [Br. Lit.: Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Art of Storytelling Show is the world's sole interview format show dedicated to exploring the art and science of storytelling in all its forms.
Eric Wolf has brought storytelling to the Smithsonian, the American Museum of Natural history in New York City and Columbia University.
Press releases detailing the growth of the Art of Storytelling Show go to:
Professional storytellers like Nothando Zulu, director of the Minneapolis-based Black Storytellers Alliance, and Jamal Koram of Philadelphia's Keepers of the Culture oral tradition organization, make a living at steady gigs with schools and libraries during "storytelling season, when school is open and, of course, there's high demand around Kwanzaa, Black History Month and King's birthday," says Baltimore librarian Bunjo Butler, a member of the Griots' Circle of Maryland, an affiliate of the nation's largest black storytelling group, the National Association of Black Storytellers (NABS).
NABS annually produces the major black storytelling festival in the nation, which now attracts upwards of 500 people(see "Storytelling Festivals and Resources, 2003" page 62).
Mother Griot, who started life during World War I in the rough and unruly rural South of 1917, graduated from Baltimore's Coppin State College and followed up with graduate work in drama and storytelling at New York University, Johns Hopkins and Rutgers.
Elizabeth Parkhurst of August House, a main publisher of storytelling guides and folktale anthologies, explains that storytelling's visions spring from the grassroots.
Because while storytelling prizes and extends oral traditions, the storytelling world in no way eschews literacy.