Pythagorean Theorem

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Pythagorean theorem

[pə‚thag·ə′rē·ən ′thir·əm]
(mathematics)
In a right triangle the square of the length of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the squares of the lengths of the other two sides.

Pythagorean Theorem

 

a theorem in geometry stating the relationship between the sides of a right triangle. The theorem was evidently known before the time of Pythagoras (sixth century B.C.), but its general proof is ascribed to him. Originally, the theorem stated the relationship between the areas of squares constructed on the hypotenuse and legs of a right triangle: the square on the hypotenuse is equal in area to the sum of the squares on the legs. The customary, more concise, formulation of the Pythagorean theorem is that the square of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the legs. The converse of the Pythagorean theorem is also true: if the square of one side of a triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the two other sides, the triangle is a right triangle.

Pythagorean Theorem

References in periodicals archive ?
2008b) and the straight line distance between the two study areas is only 123 km, we pooled data on animals for both study areas for further analysis.
In our study, we measured the distance between the marking place and the place where the animal was reported, as the straight line distance.
The straight line distance is 450 m both for the outer and inner tracks, and they are 450 m and 350 m in curved line distances, respectively.
We then calculated the straight line distances from the GPS birth site to the simulated VHF post-parturition site.