Straight-line depreciation


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Straight-line depreciation

A depreciation deduction calculated by subtracting any anticipated salvage value from the initial cost or value of the improvements, and then dividing the estimated economic life of the improvements into that figure.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is highly unusual as depreciation is typically measured using either straight-line depreciation or an accelerated method that reports declining depreciation amounts each period.
In respect of straight-line depreciation, the allowed rate on telecommunications equipment with a useful life closest to the average life of 21 years referred to above, being 20 years for "cabling", is .
Tax-based depreciation is an accelerated method, and more complicated than straight-line depreciation.
Election to use straight-line depreciation for purposes of the entertainment disallowance
at a 50 percent rate using the straight-line depreciation method).
45) According to the straight-line depreciation method, annual depreciation is calculated by subtracting the salvage value of the asset from the purchase price (46) and dividing this number by the estimated useful life of the asset.
Similarly, straight-line depreciation and capital gains taxation based on historical cost went out of kilter when inflation rose, inviting accelerated depreciation, bigger capital gains exclusions and today's movement for inflation-adjusted basis.
Nonresidential property-related improvements placed in service after the date of enactment (and before January 1, 2006) qualify for a 15-year recovery period, using straight-line depreciation instead of being required to be depreciated over 39 years.
Once the correct percentage of obsolescence due to underutilization is determined, total obsolescence in absolute dollar terms is given by multiplying %OBS by the replacement cost new less straight-line depreciation (RCNSLD).
The Asset Manager supports a variety of depreciation methods, including no depreciation, straight-line depreciation, and declining balance depreciation, as well as user defined schedules.
Previously, the depreciation estimates were derived using straight-line depreciation and assumed patterns of retirements.
Where specific information on these prices is not available, BEA has assumed that depreciation occurs at a constant percentage rate, rather than assuming, as in the present methodology, straight-line depreciation.