strath

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strath

Scot a broad flat river valley
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

strath

[strath]
(geology)
A broad, elongate depression with steep sides on the continental shelf.
An extensive remnant of a broad, flat valley floor that has undergone degradation following uplift.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Long profiles of strath terraces in young tectonic settings frequently display upstream or downstream convergence, dome-or basin-like warping and/or faulting (Fig.
The rates of erosional downcutting of strath terraces changed between 0.02 to 2 mm /yr, increasing in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene in the western portion of the Outer Western Carpathians (OWC), when intensive erosion was restricted to neotectonically active elevations truncated by the Raba and Dunajec river valleys (Zuchiewicz, 1984, 1995, 1998; Wojcik, 1989; Olszak, 2008).
These are strath, cut-and-fill and complex response-type (Bull, 1990) terraces.
The Weichselian and Holocene terraces are cut-and-fill landforms, the remaining ones represent strath terraces (Wojcik, 1989).
14), two zones of strath warping occur between Wielopole and Marcinkowice and near Znamirowice.
Small-scale disturbances in strath long profiles are noticeable close to Bobowa and Zborowice, not always coinciding with bedrock faults.
The upper, poorly dissected reach of the upper Jasiolka River valley reveals strath terraces from the Saalian-2, Weichselian and Holocene times (Zuchiewicz, 1988).
The above review points to differentiated neotectonic behaviour of faults displacing or warping strath terraces of Pleistocene age.
Short-term episodes of deep incision of strath terraces were associated with early interglacial phases.
In more strongly uplifted areas, in turn, the number of strath terraces increases, and climate cycles of short duration (up to 20 thousand years) may lead to shaping of several erosional steps.
Recent estimates point to three episodes of increased fluvial dissection of strath terraces (Zuchiewicz, 1995, 1998, 2009): Cromerian-Elsterian 1-2 (ca.
The above review indicates that young tectonic mobility of the Carpathians is largely inferred from deformations of long river bed profiles and variable rates of strath dissection.

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