Stratigraphic Zone

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stratigraphic Zone

 

the stratigraphic unit next in rank below a stage and including beds corresponding to the period of the existence of a distinctive group of fossils not found in overlying and underlying deposits. The stratigraphic zone is named after one or two of the most characteristic fossil types of the given group. Many zones are local but some have been identified on several continents and are worldwide, for example, the zones established in the Ordovician and Silurian on evidence of graptolites; in the Mesozoic, of ammonites; and in the Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neocene, of planktonic foraminifera and nannoplankton.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The data consisted of 48 cases, each case representing the location of owl pellets containing rodent remains in a specific stratigraphic zone within a specific site.
The wells are designed to test four stratigraphic zones known to exist in the KGSU, namely the Senora, Earlsboro, Booch and Gilcrease Sands, which are located respectively at 2490, 2620, 2670 and 2820 ft.
The specific well locations were selected in order to test the four stratigraphic zones cited above near the highest structural points on the property, which are highly prospective for helium.
In addition to the many folded and faulted traps, there is a variety of stratigraphic zones yet to be properly studied.
This formation will be the first of nine separate potential stratigraphic zones identified for EOR using CO2 injection.
Cummings (1987) has broken down the amygdaloids into four distinct and discernible stratigraphic zones based on the secondary mineralization expected in each.
The 1990 and 1991 excavations confirmed the presence of four stratigraphic zones. Because the open plan excavation methods allowed for finer stratigraphic resolution, some zones have been divided into more subzones than were originally defined in 1983.
They lie in a wide range of stratigraphic zones spanning from Paleozoic to Cenozoic.
Structurally, it is a wide southeast convex belt comprising several thrust-bounding stratigraphic zones. The belt has been folded into tight narrow anticlines and broad synclines (Iqbal, 2004) representing transpressional to compressional deformation styles from its western edge to the eastern limits.