Strehl ratio


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Strehl ratio

[′strāl ‚rā·shō]
(optics)
The ratio of the peak field amplitude in the focus of an optical element to the diffraction-limited amplitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Strehl ratio for all aberrations showed no difference between the groups; however, the Strehl ratio for higher-order aberrations was barely significantly higher in the Tecnis group (p = 0.07).
The Strehl ratio and the height of the modulation function (MTF) curve for higher-order aberrations were both larger in the Tecnis group, indicating a better optical quality.
The primary outcomes were distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA), uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA), distance-corrected near visual acuity (DCNVA) and corrected near visual acuity (CNVA), higher-order aberrations (HOAs), MTF cut-off, and Strehl ratio.
Strehl Ratio. Higher values of the Strehl ratio indicate better vision quality.
The Strehl ratio reflects the level of image quality in the presence of wavefront aberrations.
Brenner, "Corneal higher-order aberrations and higher-order Strehl ratio after aberration-free ablation profile to treat compound myopic astigmatism," Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, vol.
(d) indicates significantly lower Strehl ratio in the open-globe-injury group than in the controls.
Ocular and corneal Strehl ratio and MTF were not statistically significantly different between groups (P > 0.05, all comparisons) (Tables 3 and 4).
Confirming the wavefront results, the objective visual quality did not differ between groups as determined by the Strehl ratio and modulation transfer function.
Figure 6 also shows the visual quality results for distance in terms of the visual Strehl ratio. The VSOTF results were calculated through a pupil of 3 mm diameter.
Iskander, "Computational aspects of the visual Strehl ratio," Optometry & Vision Science, vol.
Modulation transfer function (MTF) and Strehl ratio are well related to the image quality of an optical system, including the human eye [9].